Checking it out

The open mouth of a <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ANSP0000021" title="Snakehead (fish)" href="/topic/science-technology/science/zoology/snakehead-%28fish%29-ANSP0000021.topic">snakehead</a> fish is held up after being caught by Jason Calvert, from JC's Custom Baits, while fishing in a canal in <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100403290000" title="Weston (Broward, Florida)" href="/topic/us/florida/broward-county/weston-%28broward-florida%29-PLGEO100100403290000.topic">Weston</a>, Florida. The invasive snakehead fish is known for its aggressiveness and they're eating anything from bass to turtles and an occasional duckling. It is unknown exactly how the species, that is native to parts of Asia, was introduced to the South Florida area but it concerns people because the presence of an exotic species can alter the ecosystem to the detriment of native species. A healthy number of fisherman now go after the fish which helps control the species and puts what many fisherman say is a tasty fish on their plate.

( Getty Images / May 16, 2012 )

The open mouth of a snakehead fish is held up after being caught by Jason Calvert, from JC's Custom Baits, while fishing in a canal in Weston, Florida. The invasive snakehead fish is known for its aggressiveness and they're eating anything from bass to turtles and an occasional duckling. It is unknown exactly how the species, that is native to parts of Asia, was introduced to the South Florida area but it concerns people because the presence of an exotic species can alter the ecosystem to the detriment of native species. A healthy number of fisherman now go after the fish which helps control the species and puts what many fisherman say is a tasty fish on their plate.

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook