UM gets record gift for celiac disease research

Doctors at the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="OREDU0000156" title="University of Maryland, College Park" href="/topic/education/colleges-universities/university-of-maryland-college-park-OREDU0000156.topic">University of Maryland</a> Center for Celiac Research have received a major boost in their efforts to find new treatments, and even a cure, for the autoimmune disease - a $45 million donation that is a record for the university system.<br>
<br>
The donation, directed by the family of a grateful patient from Indiana, will be announced Oct. 28 by the center's director, Dr. Alessio Fasano.Fasano said the money will be used to create a first-of-its-kind institute that could eventually employ up to 200 doctors and researchers. They will not only study the often-misdiagnosed celiac disease but use it as a model to study other related diseases, including <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="HEDAI0000022" title="Diabetes" href="/topic/health/diseases-illnesses/diabetes-HEDAI0000022.topic">diabetes</a>, rheumatoid arthritis and <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="HEDAI0000030" title="Multiple Sclerosis" href="/topic/health/diseases-illnesses/multiple-sclerosis-HEDAI0000030.topic">multiple sclerosis</a>.<br>
<br>
"Finding enough money is always a problem," Fasano said in an interview about the donation. "What we really need for a major breakthrough is thinking out of the box, and this will allow us to do just that."

( Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun / October 27, 2010 )

Doctors at the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research have received a major boost in their efforts to find new treatments, and even a cure, for the autoimmune disease - a $45 million donation that is a record for the university system.

The donation, directed by the family of a grateful patient from Indiana, will be announced Oct. 28 by the center's director, Dr. Alessio Fasano.Fasano said the money will be used to create a first-of-its-kind institute that could eventually employ up to 200 doctors and researchers. They will not only study the often-misdiagnosed celiac disease but use it as a model to study other related diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

"Finding enough money is always a problem," Fasano said in an interview about the donation. "What we really need for a major breakthrough is thinking out of the box, and this will allow us to do just that."

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook
Advertisement