National Politics
On Selma's 50th anniversary, Obama will look to the future
Books Jacket Copy

For 'I Read Everywhere' campaign, images of readers everywhere

@NYPL asks you to #IReadEverywhere your pics reading anywhere and everywhere
Obsessed readers of the world, unite! #IReadEverywhere from @NYPL
Where do you read?

If you’re such an obsessive reader that you take books mountain climbing with you, or if you read while walking (a potentially hazardous activity), or if you simply fill as much free time as you can with reading, then the New York Public Library wants to hear from you.

This month, the library launched a reading initiative with the hashtag #ireadeverywhere. The idea is to fill social media with pictures that show how reading and books are a part of people’s everyday lives. Now the images of people reading on subways, in trains, in parks and even baseball stadiums are circulating widely in social media.

Some can be seen on the New York Public Library’s Tumblr page, including images of the actors Mindy Kaling and Jim Parsons posing with books. “I am standing awkwardly reading the wonderful Buster Keaton biography, ‘Cut to the Chase’ by Marion Meade,” Parsons wrote on his Instragram page.

“Thousands of people from around the globe have participated on Twitter and Instagram, sharing pics of themselves at bars, under their desks at work, in France, in national parks, on the train, in doctors' offices, in airplanes, at White Castle, underwater, in cars, in restaurants,” NYPL spokesperson Angela Montefinise said in an email to The Times.

Hillary Clinton tweeted an old family photograph in which she’s reading to her daughter and wrote: “For #IReadEverywhere w/ @NYPL, I'm reminded of moments reading to Chelsea when she was little. Let's #closethewordgap”

The English author Neil Gaiman posted a picture of himself reading “Men Explain Things to Me,” by Rebecca Solnit. “I am on a train. #IReadEverywhere but especially on trains,” he wrote.

Héctor tweets about topics literary as @TobarWriter

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
  • Novelist Tania James talks rogue elephants, India and conservation
    Novelist Tania James talks rogue elephants, India and conservation

    A rogue elephant named the Gravedigger is the main narrator of "The Tusk That Did the Damage" (Alfred A. Knopf: 240 pp., $24.95), Tania James' imaginative novel exploring the ivory trade in the forests of south India. Orphaned at birth by a poacher, the Gravedigger seeks revenge for his...

  • Hanif Kureishi's 'The Last Word' lacks a certain sense of voice
    Hanif Kureishi's 'The Last Word' lacks a certain sense of voice

    Hanif Kureishi's "The Last Word" suffers from the genius problem: To create a believable virtuoso, the character's brilliance must light up the page. Such an issue arises any time an author tries to write about such a figure: J.D. Salinger, whose weakest effort, the novella "Hapworth 16, 1924,"...

  • Trying to make sense of the world of ubiquitous surveillance
    Trying to make sense of the world of ubiquitous surveillance

    Airports are exemplars of our surveillance society. Here a raft of digital surveillance, targeting and sorting systems come together. And they start working well before you arrive for check-in, with the U.S. government comparing your name against watch lists as soon as you buy a ticket.

  • India bans 'Fifty Shades of Grey' film, but the book's a hit there
    India bans 'Fifty Shades of Grey' film, but the book's a hit there

    Indian censors have decided the movie "Fifty Shades of Grey" is too sexy to be released there. Don't tell them the book is on their bestseller lists.

  • Dennis Lehane drinks in some sunlight
    Dennis Lehane drinks in some sunlight

    Dennis Lehane is one of Boston's best-known writers. Born and raised in the community of Dorchester (or, as he would pronounce it, "Dorchestah"), he's got a Bostonian no-nonsense, tough-guy edge, and his books, including "Mystic River" and the six-book Kenzie-Gennaro mystery series, are set...

  • Indie spotlight: Pushkin Press
    Indie spotlight: Pushkin Press

    When Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel" won Oscars for its costumes, makeup, score and production design, it swept something else along in its winning tide: Austrian writer Stefan Zweig. The long-deceased author, who wrote in German, penned the personal stories that were the film's...

Comments
Loading