Open space a winner in legislative session [Letter]

The Maryland General Assembly has wisely reaffirmed the importance of maintaining Program Open Space, the state's premier program to conserve land and create recreation areas, as a dedicated fund based on revenues from the transfer of real estate ("Crunching numbers on Maryland's land," April 18).

While the legislature cut Rural Legacy and the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Fund by $9 million, we were pleased the assembly rejected a restructuring of land conservation programs proposed by the Department of Legislative Services. The restructuring would have gutted the state's ability to ensure a sustainable natural resource base of conserved farms, forests, and state parks, all of which are drivers of the state's economy.

We applaud members of the assembly and the partners for open space that worked hard to protect these vital programs.

Joel Dunn, Annapolis

The writer is executive director of Chesapeake Conservancy.

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