Who has been hurt by gay marriage?

Your October 11 article on Frank Schubert and his opposition to same-sex marriage cites him as raising the threat of "unintended, negative results" if same-sex marriage passes in Maryland ("Same-sex marriage foes get help from out of state," Oct. 12). Unfortunately, your reporter seems not to have asked the obvious follow-up:

"Counting the states (including the District of Columbia) that allow same-sex marriage, and the number of years it has been legal in each, we have about twenty years' experience with it. What unintended negative consequences have there been so far?"

The honest answer would be "none."

Personally, I had the honor three years ago of participating in the wedding of two dear friends (both women), who had been in a steady, loving relationship for 25 years — and who have the good fortune to live in Iowa. I'm happy to report that it did nothing to weaken my own marriage of 40 years to the same woman.

Dale Neiburg, Laurel

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
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