Curtis B. Reiber, Army officer

DefenseColleges and UniversitiesUnrest, Conflicts and WarReligion and BeliefCentral Michigan UniversityIranThe Pentagon

Curtis B. Reiber, an Army intelligence officer whose career spanned three decades, died Nov. 20 of a stroke at Saint Agnes Hospital. He was 77.

The son of a DuPont Co. worker and a homemaker, Curtis Brooks Reiber was born in Centre Hall, Pa., and raised in Woodstown, N.J., where he graduated in 1954 from Woodstown High School.

He was a 1958 graduate of Elizabethtown College in Elizabethtown, Pa., and earned a master's degree from Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant.

Mr. Reiber was drafted into the Army in 1958 and the next year graduated from Officer Candidate School. He was also a graduate of the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa.

He served two tours of duty in Vietnam, where he was awarded the Purple Heart, two Bronze Stars and the Army Commendation Medal with "V" for Valor.

After leaving Vietnam, Mr. Reiber's career was focused on military intelligence, and from 1972 to 1974, he was stationed in Tehran, Iran, as intelligence adviser to the Army, Navy, Air Force and Joint Staff.

He was stationed in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from 1978 to 1979, where he served as military intelligence adviser to Saudi Arabia. He returned to Riyadh in 1984, where for the next three years he was the Defense and Army attache at the American Embassy.

When not posted abroad, Mr. Reiber was a senior military intelligence officer at the Pentagon's Defense Intelligence Agency.

He had attained the rank of colonel and retired from the Army in 1989. In 2001, he was inducted into the Army Officer Candidate School Hall of Fame at Fort Benning, Ga.

Mr. Reiber lived in Bowie from 1970 until 2009, when he and his wife, the former Margaret "Peggy" Chester, an educator, moved to the Charlestown retirement community.

For nearly 40 years, Mr. Reiber and his wife had been active communicants of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Bowie, where he was associated with the Holy Trinity Episcopal Day School, which Mrs. Reiber headed.

At the time of his death, Mr. Reiber was chairman of the church's building and grounds committee and was superintendent of Holy Trinity Cemetery. He also had served for six years as senior warden.

Mr. Reiber had been a member of the board for many years of the Episcopal Center for Children in Washington.

A world traveler, Mr. Reiber was an avid flower and vegetable gardener. He also enjoyed an annual family vacation to Whalehead Beach on the Outer Banks.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Dec. 22 in Our Lady of the Angels Chapel at Charlestown, 711 Maiden Choice Lane, Catonsville.

In addition to his wife of 51 years, Mr. Reiber is survived by a son, Curtis B. Reiber of Richmond, Va.; three daughters, Pamela R. Roth of Arnold, Susan R. Powell of Baltimore, and Katherine R. Loughran of Berlin, Germany; a sister, Mary Donley of Melbourne, Fla.; and 10 grandchildren.

fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com

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