BusinessAutos

Keith Richards' 1972 Ferrari Dino 246GT rolling to auction

Automotive IndustryExotic and Classic Cars

You can’t always get what you want, but if you have several hundred thousand dollars lying around, you might be able to pick up Keith Richards’ Ferrari.

Coys, an auction house based in England, has announced it will be selling a 1972 Ferrari Dino 246 GT that used to belong to the Rolling Stones musician. The car will be sold at no reserve at an auction in Monaco on May 9.

"When one adds to the Ferrari proven long-term ownership by rock and roll aristocracy, this car has to be the ultimate Dino and will surely give any car collector and rock enthusiast a great 'Satisfaction'!" Chris Routledge, managing partner at Coys, said in a statement.

PHOTOS: Keith Richards' Ferrari Dino 246GT

The Dino was a subbrand produced by Ferrari to compete with brands like Porsche that were cheaper than the Italian brand’s traditional V-12 models. Named after Enzo Ferrari’s son, the V-6 Dinos were also noteworthy for being Ferrari’s first foray into mid-engine sports cars.

The 246 GT was the second model under the Dino banner and was built from 1969 to 1973. The cars had a 2.4-liter V-6 that moved 195 horsepower to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual transmission. The cars cost around $14,500 new.

In 1972, Richards bought this particular Dino in California. He shipped it to the U.K. in 1975 and owned it until 1986, Coys said. During that time, the rocker put about 25,000 miles on it before selling it to a Japanese collector, where it has remained ever since. Included in the sale is a letter from the Stones’ manager Alex Dunn confirming Richards’ ownership of the Dino and verifying the mileage he put on it.

Coys estimates the car will sell for between $277,000 and $347,000 when it crosses the auction block on Friday. That compares with a regular Dino from the same year which would be worth no more than $235,000 if it were in perfect condition, according to Hagerty, a classic car insurance company.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
Automotive IndustryExotic and Classic Cars
Comments
Loading