How a couple can reach agreement on retirement plans

A couple disagree on what they will do during retirement, and they need to start planning financially. These steps can help.

Dear Liz: My husband and I are 56. We need to plan for retirement, but whenever the topic comes up, I find that either we have no idea or we disagree on what we will do during our retirement. Naturally, our activities during retirement will affect the funds we will need. We need help to figure out the things we agree on and where we might want to plan for different individual options. Do you have some resources to suggest?

Answer: You can start with a visualization exercise that some financial planners use to clarify their clients' values.

Imagine your ideal day in retirement. Start with when you'll wake up and where — what type of dwelling and in what area. In your mind, walk through your day hour by hour — where you'll be, what you'll be doing and with whom. Write it all down, even if you don't think what you're visualizing is realistic or even possible. The point is to identify, for yourself and your partner, what's most important to you: what you want your life to be like and whom you want in it. If you visualize waking up in Paris, for example, it doesn't mean you need to move there. You may be just as content with a trip to the City of Light or travel to less-expensive destinations.

You each should do the exercise separately and then compare what you've written. Don't despair if you visualize yourself on the Champs-Elysees and he's fishing off his back porch. As you correctly note, you can have different goals and desires for retirement. Complete harmony has never been a requirement of staying married, and that won't change when you quit your jobs.

Let's say you want to get deeply immersed as a volunteer for a local, at-risk school, and your husband wants to spend a year roaming the country in an RV. He could opt to pursue other interests during the school year, and you could take extended trips together during the breaks.

Once you're clearer about what you want for your retirements, you can start working the numbers and figuring out compromises that work for both of you. Start with your expenses — what you're spending annually now — and subtract any costs that will disappear or substantially diminish when you retire (such as commuting expenses and work clothes). Add in the amounts you'll need to pursue your passions. (Will you buy the RV used or new? In retirement or before? Tip: Buying a lightly used vehicle before retirement will give you both a chance to get the hang of RVing and its costs so you can decide whether it's really for you.)

Compare your expected expenses with your expected income, including Social Security, any pensions and withdrawals from your retirement accounts (which initially should be just 3% to 4% of the total balance, planners say). If there's a gap, that's what you'll need to fill in the coming years with increased savings.

Still at an impasse? Hire a fee-only planner who has experience in "life planning," or helping clients figure out their life goals. You can get a referral from the Kinder Institute of Life Planning at http://www.kinderinstitute.com/dir/.

Homeowners feel desperate to sell

Dear Liz: Two years ago we moved to another state. Our old house hasn't sold in that time, as the housing market there is terrible. We have it listed for $255,000 and owe $242,000. A recent appraisal came back at $190,000 to $205,000 despite the fact that it's in good condition and only 11 years old. We were thinking we should do a mortgage release on the property to get rid of it as we just can't keep up the mortgage payments any longer. We didn't think a short sale would work because there's been no interest yet on the property. Any suggestions?

Answer: What you're calling a "mortgage release" is actually a foreclosure, and it would devastate your credit for years to come. That may turn out to be the best of bad options, but explore others first.

Perhaps there's been no interest in your property because the asking price is too high. Talk to a real estate agent with experience in short sales about what listing price is likely to generate offers. A short sale would hurt your credit scores, although perhaps less severely than a foreclosure if you can persuade the lender not to report the deficiency balance (the difference between what you owe on the mortgage and the sale price). The advantage of a short sale is that you'd spend less time in mortgage lenders' "penalty box" and may qualify for another loan within two years.

Questions may be sent to Liz Weston, 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604, or by using the "Contact" form at asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

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