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Deciding which student loan to pay off first

Money Talk

Dear Liz: I am going to pay off one of my daughter's private student loans. One has a balance of $8,500 at 4% interest and the other is for $7,500 at 6%. Which one should I pay off?

Answer: You have a lucky daughter, either way.

In addition to balances and rates, the other variable you need to consider is whether the rates are fixed or adjustable. These days, many private student loans have fixed rates, but in the past most of this debt had variable rates. Variable rates mean higher costs and larger payments when interest rates rise.

If both loans have variable rates, or both are fixed, then paying off the highest rate debt first makes the most sense. If the lower rate loan is variable and the higher rate one is fixed, you'll have to guess whether interest rates are likely to rise enough in the next few years to instead pay the larger balance first. Some people might want to pay off a variable debt just to eliminate the uncertainty, while others are willing to gamble that rates aren't likely to jump two full percentage points before the loan is scheduled to be paid off.

Paying capital gains tax

Dear Liz: I'm very confused about the long-term capital gains tax. Several years ago, I bought a house for $525,000 in Texas. I've been thinking about selling, and my real estate agent informed me that my home is now worth $1.5 million. I am a disabled veteran and have no tax liability because my income is tax-free. Since this is my primary residence, I know that the first $250,000 in gains is exempt from tax. What I just don't understand is what my tax liability will be on the rest of the money.

Answer: If you sell this house, you'll essentially go from the bottom tax bracket to the top. Single people with incomes over $415,050 in 2016 are subject to the 39.6% marginal tax rate.

Most people pay capital gains tax at a 15% rate, but those in the top bracket face a 20% rate.

Improvements you've made to the house and some other expenses, such as selling costs, can reduce the amount of gain that's subject to tax.

This big windfall could have other effects on your taxes, so you'll want to consult a tax professional before proceeding.

Social Security survivor's benefit

Dear Liz: I am 63 and retired but have not started to collect my Social Security. My husband will be 67 in March. He started his Social Security at 62. Our plan is to wait until I am 70 to start my benefit, which would make my monthly amount significantly larger than his. If I predecease my husband, would he be able to collect my benefit instead of his own? If I started benefits now, our checks would be relatively close in size, although mine would be a bit higher than his current amount.

Answer: If you had started benefits already, your husband's survivor benefit would equal what you were receiving when you died. Since you didn't start early, though, your husband will get more.

If you should die before your full retirement age of 66 without starting retirement benefits, he would receive a survivor benefit equal to what you would have received at 66.

If you continue to delay benefits past age 66, your retirement — and thus his survivor benefit — would accrue the "delayed retirement credits" that boost your Social Security check by 8% annually between age 66 and age 70, when your benefit maxes out. In other words, if you die between 66 and 70 without starting benefits, he would get the delayed retirement credits and larger check you'd earned even if your checks hadn't started.

As you can see, delaying the start of benefits is a great way to maximize what a survivor receives. It's particularly important for the higher earner in a couple to put off filing for retirement benefits for as long as possible.

Liz Weston is a personal finance columnist for NerdWallet. Questions may be sent to her at 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604, or by using the "Contact" form at asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times
A version of this article appeared in print on February 06, 2016, in the Business section of the Los Angeles Times with the headline "Deciding which loan to pay off - MONEY TALK" — Today's paperToday's paper | Subscribe
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