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Vintage SoCal: An artistic reuse in Lincoln Heights

The historic facade of this former Edison Electric substation in Lincoln Heights still recalls its origins. The industrial-vibe structure was built in 1922 — the same year the Hollywood Bowl opened and President Warren G. Harding enjoyed the first radio in the White House.

The structure’s inside, however, has been brought forward many decades with a whole new purpose as a contemporary live-work space.

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Art Deco exteriors give way to light-flooded interiors, embellished by glass expanses, steel girders, colored accent walls and concrete finishes. The centerpiece of the Brewery Arts Complex, the building has served as a house, a gallery, an arts-event site and a show-dog kennel since its conversion by RoTo Architects in the 1990s.

The multilevel Carlson-Reges Residence, named for the couple who commissioned the design, opens to a ground-floor art studio. Wood and metal staircases lead to the second floor, which is laid out for entertaining. A sleek kitchen features stainless appliances and frosted-glass covered cabinetry.

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Overlooking rail yards and city lights is a glass-clad penthouse suite, the largest of three bedrooms within the 4,407 square feet of open-plan living space. Stone is used extensively in the three bathrooms.

On the highest level, space for a gym sits under a metal ceiling.

Despite the concrete shell and modern-style updates, not all the surfaces are hard. Walls of glass take in a tranquil open-air deck sheltered by vine-covered walls. A reflecting pool was created from a deconstructed liquid storage tank that was once on-site.

And more greenery is in the creative space’s future. The half-acre property looks out onto what will be the home of the Los Angeles River Park.

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The property, at 698 Moulton Ave., Los Angeles, is priced at $7.35 million.

Christopher Pomeroy of Crosby Doe Associates is the listing agent.

This occasional feature celebrates Southern California’s architectural heritage through homes built before 1950.

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