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Facebook has updated its Look Back feature with the ability to let users edit their minute-long personalized videos.

The company launched Look Back earlier this week as a way to let users partake in its 10th birthday celebration. The videos show users' top moments, photos and status updates from their time on the social network.

Look Back proved to be quite popular, with "hundreds of millions" of users trying the feature and sharing their videos with their friends.

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But some users were upset with their videos because they brought back memories that they would rather forget.

"My son and his girl split in October and my look back featured her," one reader wrote in an email to The Times. "l was so disappointed. My husband was not featured, nor my sons, nor myself interacting with our granddaughter, just pic of the girl who left my son and pics of her parents."

"Watch my lookback on Facebook. 'Oh gawd, I hate you 15 y/o me!'" one user on Twitter said.

Users who wish to edit their videos can go to Facebook.com/lookback where they must then click on the "Edit" button toward the top right corner of the screen. Users are then taken to a new page where they check off content they don't want included in their videos and mark different content that they would like to include.

Editing is simple and can be done within a few seconds. Once users are finished editing their videos, they can click on "Update" and also choose to share it on their Facebook Timeline for others to see.

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