Reading his mind

A <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORCRP007390" title="Honda Motor Co." href="/topic/economy-business-finance/manufacturing-engineering/automotive-equipment/honda-motor-co.-ORCRP007390.topic">Honda Motor Co.</a> employee puts on a headgear with codes attached during a demonstration of Honda's new technology linking brain thoughts with robotics at the Japanese automaker's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan on Tuesday. Honda has developed a way to read patterns of electric currents on a person's scalp as well as changes in cerebral blood flow when a person thinks about four simple movements -- moving the right hand, moving the left hand, trotting and eating. Honda succeeded in analyzing such thought patterns, and then relaying them as wireless commands for Asimo, its human-shaped robot.

( AP photo by Koji Sasahara / March 31, 2009 )

A Honda Motor Co. employee puts on a headgear with codes attached during a demonstration of Honda's new technology linking brain thoughts with robotics at the Japanese automaker's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan on Tuesday. Honda has developed a way to read patterns of electric currents on a person's scalp as well as changes in cerebral blood flow when a person thinks about four simple movements -- moving the right hand, moving the left hand, trotting and eating. Honda succeeded in analyzing such thought patterns, and then relaying them as wireless commands for Asimo, its human-shaped robot.

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