Nobel Prize in chemistry

Prof. Ada Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science speaks to the media during a press conference at the Weizmann Institute in the central Israeli city of Rechovot. Two Americans and an Israeli scientist, Ada Yonath, a professor of structural biology, won the 2009 <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="8006070" title="Nobel Prize Awards" href="/topic/arts-culture/nobel-prize-awards-8006070.topic">Nobel Prize</a> in chemistry on Wednesday for atom-by-atom mapping of the protein-making factories within cells, a feat that has spurred the development of antibiotics. Yonath, 70, is the fourth woman to win the Nobel chemistry prize and the first since 1964, when Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin of Britain received the award.

( AP photo by Dan Balilty / October 7, 2009 )

Prof. Ada Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science speaks to the media during a press conference at the Weizmann Institute in the central Israeli city of Rechovot. Two Americans and an Israeli scientist, Ada Yonath, a professor of structural biology, won the 2009 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for atom-by-atom mapping of the protein-making factories within cells, a feat that has spurred the development of antibiotics. Yonath, 70, is the fourth woman to win the Nobel chemistry prize and the first since 1964, when Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin of Britain received the award.

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