The brain and depression

The brain and depression: It's pretty obvious now that I was suffering from depression. Scientists don't know everything about it, but they do know it's something gone wrong in the brain. In a teenager, it can be really tricky. It can look like a bad case of the blues. That's what my parents thought for a while. That's what a lot of parents think. <br><br>When people are clinically depressed, their brains operate differently.  Neurotransmitters or chemical messengers -- especially serotonin and norepinephrine -- get weaker and weaker.<br><br>Signaling between the brain and the body occurs chemically, through neurons or nerve cells, via junctions or synapses.<br><br>A reduction in neurotransmitter levels may lead to a lowering of mood.

( Tribune illustration by Phil Geib / May 8, 2012 )

The brain and depression: It's pretty obvious now that I was suffering from depression. Scientists don't know everything about it, but they do know it's something gone wrong in the brain. In a teenager, it can be really tricky. It can look like a bad case of the blues. That's what my parents thought for a while. That's what a lot of parents think.

When people are clinically depressed, their brains operate differently. Neurotransmitters or chemical messengers -- especially serotonin and norepinephrine -- get weaker and weaker.

Signaling between the brain and the body occurs chemically, through neurons or nerve cells, via junctions or synapses.

A reduction in neurotransmitter levels may lead to a lowering of mood.

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