ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ARTS & CULTURE Culture Monster

Shia LaBeouf stages L.A. art installation titled "#IAMSORRY"

We know this to be true: Shia LaBeouf is sorry. Sincerely sorry.

What for? In December, LaBeouf used work, without giving credit, by the illustrator Daniel Clowes in his short film, "HowardCantour.com."

After a storm of plagiarism allegations, LaBeouf issued an apology that read, in part: "In my excitement and naiveté as an amateur filmmaker, I got lost in the creative process and neglected to follow proper accreditation. ... I'm embarrassed that I failed to credit @danielclowes for his original graphic novella Justin M. Damiano, which served as my inspiration. ... I was truly moved by his piece of work & I knew that it would make a poignant & relevant short. I apologize to all who assumed I wrote it."

PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times

Now LaBeouf is putting on a collaborative art installation titled "#IAMSORRY" with Finnish performance artist Nastja Säde Rönkkö and painter Luke Turner at L.A.’s Cohen Gallery. It will run from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday at the gallery, which is at 7354 Beverly Blvd.

Will the exhibit be as strange as LaBeouf’s behavior lately? On Sunday, the actor showed up at the Berlin premiere of Lars von Trier's “Nymphomaniac: Volume I,” which features LeBeouf, wearing a black tuxedo with a paper bag over his head that read: “I Am Not Famous Anymore.”

That, of course, is not an accurate statement. Fame is just turning into infamy.

ALSO:

Hammer Museum to offer free admission 

An appropriate time for appropriation art at Hammer

Sochi Olympics: American choreographer takes on opening ceremony

Twitter: @debvankin

MORE

PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage

CHEAT SHEET: Spring arts preview 2014

PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
  • Behind the Shia LaBeouf controversy
    Behind the Shia LaBeouf controversy

    Of all the questions that have swirled around the Shia LaBeouf-Dan Clowes controversy, the biggest has been: Could he really not have known that making an uncredited movie with similarities to an existing graphic novel was wrong?

  • Larry David's play 'Fish in the Dark' thinks too small-screen
    Larry David's play 'Fish in the Dark' thinks too small-screen

    It's the pesky little things that make up Larry David's infinitely expandable comic universe. All those petty grievances and minor disputes, the slights and slips, the miscues and forced apologies — so flustering in our own lives, so hilarious in his.

  • How David Geffen's gift to Lincoln Center reflects on Music Center
    How David Geffen's gift to Lincoln Center reflects on Music Center

    With the news Wednesday of David Geffen's $100-million gift to Lincoln Center for the renovation of Avery Fisher Hall — which will be renamed David Geffen Concert Hall — the first sound I thought I heard was a resounding slap in the face of the Music Center.

  • 'Unfinished Business' is indeed unfinished
    'Unfinished Business' is indeed unfinished

    The piece of business that's most unfinished in the desperate comedy "Unfinished Business" is the wan hodgepodge of a script by Steve Conrad, a talented screenwriter ("The Promotion," "The Pursuit of Happyness") who should've known better. It's remarkable to think star Vince Vaughn, helmer...

  • 'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' overstays its welcome
    'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' overstays its welcome

    Honestly, when a sequel is called "Second Best" the joke is just right there, waiting. And so when it turns out that "The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" is, in fact, a lesser follow-up to its surprise 2012 hit predecessor, it tests one's sense of restraint not to go right for the obvious...

  • Oddly, the robot is the least robotic thing about 'Chappie'
    Oddly, the robot is the least robotic thing about 'Chappie'

    "Chappie" is a movie about the evolution of artificial intelligence that's as dumb as a post. It also marks the continuing devolution of the work of director and co-writer Neill Blomkamp.

Comments
Loading