ENTERTAINMENT

Charles McNulty

Columnist

Charles McNulty is the theater critic of the Los Angeles Times. He received his doctorate in dramaturgy and dramatic criticism from the Yale School of Drama. McNulty has taught at Yale, the New School, New York University, the City University of New York Graduate Center, UCLA and the California Institute of the Arts. McNulty, who got his theatrical start as a literary intern at the New York Public Theater in the days of Joseph Papp, is a former Village Voice theater critic and editor. He was the chairman of the Pulitzer drama jury in 2010. He received the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for the theater year 2009-10 and was awarded the top prize for feature writing from the Society for Features Journalism in 2011.

Recent Articles

  • The real magic of 'Matilda' is in the story of a spirited, bookish girl

    The real magic of 'Matilda' is in the story of a spirited, bookish girl

    How can you not love a musical about a badly mistreated pint-sized prodigy whose passion for reading rescues her from the bullies and boors around her? "Matilda the Musical," the British import that became a Broadway hit, has a secret weapon in its title character — a precocious 5-year-old who...

  • Tony Awards show a new maturity in theater scene

    Tony Awards show a new maturity in theater scene

    Broadway went big this year. Big box office, big attendance, big flops and big statements. The biggest statement by far was "Fun Home" winning five Tonys, including the best musical award, the grandest and most lucrative prize of all. The show, based on the graphic memoir by lesbian cartoonist...

  • Showy or rich? Energetic or tempered? What Tony Award voters must consider

    Showy or rich? Energetic or tempered? What Tony Award voters must consider

    The world isn't a meritocracy, the prize doesn't always go to the most deserving and Vincent van Gogh isn't the only artist to have gone to his grave unheralded. Awards can conceal but not eradicate their essential arbitrariness. Still, nothing concentrates the mind quite like the spectacle of...

  • 'Murder for Two' offers exhaustingly manic music, comedy

    'Murder for Two' offers exhaustingly manic music, comedy

    "Murder for Two," a musical whodunit performed cabaret-theater style by two indefatigable actors, is part tag team, part tug of war. Jeff Blumenkrantz — bald, gangly and boisterously over-the-top — plays all the suspects. Brett Ryback — more of the straight man, though equally suited to the role...

  • Tonys 2015: Meet the biggest hit maker on Broadway

    Tonys 2015: Meet the biggest hit maker on Broadway

    Who's the toast of Broadway at the moment? While fans of Kristin Chenoweth and Kelli O'Hara duke it out, let's raise a glass to Oskar Eustis, the Public Theater's game-changing artistic director who, since he began his tenure 10 years ago, has been retooling the American musical at the historic...

  • Tony Awards 2015: Yet another British invasion of America

    Tony Awards 2015: Yet another British invasion of America

    This year, the discussion around the Academy Awards was all about the unbearable whiteness of being an acting nominee. The Tony Awards can hardly brag about diversity. It's never a good sign when a revival of "The King and I" is the multicultural bright spot. If there hasn't been the same deluge...

  • Grasping for Dad's story in 'The Institute of Memory (TIMe)'

    Grasping for Dad's story in 'The Institute of Memory (TIMe)'

    Time veils the past in mystery for everyone, but theater artist Lars Jan's case is exceptional. His late father, an enigmatic Polish-born Cold War operative, remains an elusive figure despite the extensive documentary trail he left behind. In "The Institute of Memory (TIMe)," which concluded its...

  • Deaf West revisits 'Spring Awakening' with fresh vigor at the Wallis

    Deaf West revisits 'Spring Awakening' with fresh vigor at the Wallis

    Deaf West Theatre has a way of reimagining musicals. The company's practice of assigning certain roles to two actors, one singing, the other signing, opens the art form up to deaf performers and theatergoers. But it's more than just that: At its best, this approach to casting throws fresh aesthetic...

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