'Mystery, Alaska' (1999)

"Slap Shot's" <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB003297" title="Paul Newman" href="/topic/entertainment/paul-newman-PECLB003297.topic">Paul Newman</a> wasn't the only big star of his day to lace up the skates for a role. In 1937, <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB003941" title="John Wayne" href="/topic/entertainment/john-wayne-PECLB003941.topic">John Wayne</a> did it for "Idol of the Crowds," about a hockey player who's trying to earn money to expand his chicken farm. And in 1999, <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB001206" title="Russell Crowe" href="/topic/entertainment/russell-crowe-PECLB001206.topic">Russell Crowe</a> (above) learned how to take a wrist shot for "Mystery, Alaska," in which a ragtag team of Alaskans goes up against the pro New York Rangers in an attempt to revitalize their hometown. Unlike Newman, who played hockey as a kid, Wayne and Crowe started from scratch. "This is the hardest sport I've ever tried," Crowe said.

( Rob McEwan / Hollywood Pictures Co. )

"Slap Shot's" Paul Newman wasn't the only big star of his day to lace up the skates for a role. In 1937, John Wayne did it for "Idol of the Crowds," about a hockey player who's trying to earn money to expand his chicken farm. And in 1999, Russell Crowe (above) learned how to take a wrist shot for "Mystery, Alaska," in which a ragtag team of Alaskans goes up against the pro New York Rangers in an attempt to revitalize their hometown. Unlike Newman, who played hockey as a kid, Wayne and Crowe started from scratch. "This is the hardest sport I've ever tried," Crowe said.

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