ENTERTAINMENT MOVIES

Focus Features reflects on a decade and a half of indelible art-house images

Celebrating its 15th anniversary, Focus Features has in that time become a fixture of the art-house scene and awards circuit. The company is known for releasing such movies as “Brokeback Mountain,” “Lost in Translation,” “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “The Pianist,” “Milk,” “The Theory of Everything,” “Loving” and, currently, “The Beguiled” and “The Book of Henry,” and its films have earned 105 Academy Award nominations and won 21 Oscars.

“Focus was built from Day 1 on the belief that movies can matter and that filmmakers who are given the freedom and support to see their vision through will craft works of tremendous personal, cultural and aesthetic impact,” Chairman Peter Kujawski said via email. “We hope that moviegoers will see Focus as a place that not only entertains them but also ignites a spark of inspiration in them to feel, to connect and to make a difference in the world.”


2005

“Brokeback Mountain”

Arguably the signature film for the company, Ang Lee’s 2005 “Brokeback Mountain” features instantly indelible performances by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal as men struggling with the complex intimacy between them, set against the iconography of the American West.

Jake Gyllenhaal, left, director Ang Lee and Heath Ledger on the set of "Brokeback Mountain," a Focus Features release.
Jake Gyllenhaal, left, director Ang Lee and Heath Ledger on the set of "Brokeback Mountain," a Focus Features release. (Focus Features)

2005

“Pride & Prejudice”

Joe Wright’s 2005 adaptation of “Pride & Prejudice” brought a mud-caked rawness to the delicate romanticism of Jane Austen’s story, with a young cast that included Keira Knightley, Carey Mulligan, Rosamund Pike, Jena Malone and Talulah Riley.

From left: Carey Mulligan, Rosamund Pike, Keira Knightley and Talulah Riley on the set of "Pride & Prejudice."
From left: Carey Mulligan, Rosamund Pike, Keira Knightley and Talulah Riley on the set of "Pride & Prejudice." (Focus Features)

2012

“Moonrise Kingdom”

The bespoke filmmaking of Wes Anderson seemed a perfect fit for Focus, and his 2012 film “Moonrise Kingdom” was a runaway romance between two 12-year-olds in 1965 New England.

Jared Gilman, left, and director Wes Anderson on the set of "Moonrise Kingdom."
Jared Gilman, left, and director Wes Anderson on the set of "Moonrise Kingdom." (Niko Tavernise / Focus Features)

2002

“Far From Heaven”

Todd Haynes’ 2002 film “Far From Heaven” is another title tough to imagine many other companies getting behind, a self-aware, socially conscious story set in 1950s suburbia that was in dialogue with the heightened melodramas of Douglas Sirk. The picture continued Haynes’ ongoing collaboration with actress Julianne Moore.

Director Todd Haynes and actress Julianne Moore on the set of "Far From Heaven," a Focus Features release.
Director Todd Haynes and actress Julianne Moore on the set of "Far From Heaven," a Focus Features release. (Focus Features )

2005

“Broken Flowers”

Part of a banner year for the studio, Jim Jarmusch’s characteristically idiosyncratic comedy “Broken Flowers” starred Bill Murray, two years after he headlined Sofia Coppola’s “Lost in Translation.”

Bill Murray, left, and director Jim Jarmusch on the set of "Broken Flowers," a Focus Features release.
Bill Murray, left, and director Jim Jarmusch on the set of "Broken Flowers," a Focus Features release. (Focus Features)

2008

“Burn After Reading”

The Coen brothers brought their unique stylings to Focus for the government intelligence satire, “Burn After Reading,” starring George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton and John Malkovich.

Brad Pitt on the set of "Burn After Reading."
Brad Pitt on the set of "Burn After Reading." (Focus Features)

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