ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT MOVIES Movies Now

Hollywood Film Awards to premiere on CBS in November

The Hollywood Film Awards will make their TV debut on CBS in November

There's a new awards show on the block — or rather, on the air.

The Hollywood Film Awards will make their television debut on CBS on Nov. 14 with a two-hour ceremony airing live on the East Coast at 8 p.m. and tape-delayed on the West Coast, bookended by a 30-minute red-carpet pre-show and an hourlong post-show.

The awards will be handed out at the Hollywood Palladium. The host, presenters and performers will be announced later. "CBS This Morning's" Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell will host the post-show.

Founded 17 years ago by Carlos de Abreu, a Mozambique-born Portuguese entrepreneur, the Hollywood Film Awards tout themselves as "the official launch of the Hollywood awards season," although the ceremony has been viewed with some skepticism in the past. That's due in part to the opaque selection process for winners and early date.

The awards are decided upon by an advisory team of unnamed "film industry insiders and executives," based on "the honorees' body of work and/or a film that is to be released during the calendar year." In previous years, the HFA's mid-October date meant that many of the performances and films honored hadn't actually been seen yet at the time of the show.

Still, the HFA has become an obligatory stop on the campaign trail for A-list stars and Oscar hopefuls. CBS and Dick Clark Productions struck a TV deal for the show in January.

Nina Tassler, chairman of CBS Entertainment, said in a statement Wednesday: "For almost two decades, the evening has been limited to industry insiders. Teaming with Dick Clark Productions and 'CBS This Morning,' we look forward to giving viewers across the country a front-row seat to the entire night, from red carpet arrivals to honorees' backstage reactions."

Follow @ogettell for movie news

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
  • Artists and filmmakers make surprising leaps in 2014
    Artists and filmmakers make surprising leaps in 2014

    Exhibiting raw promise is one thing, but to exceed those initial flashes is something really special. Throughout this year, many filmmakers and performers were pressing on in remarkable ways, showing that even artists who have already exhibited notable skill, talent and accomplishment still...

  • Mark Olsen's best indie films of 2014
    Mark Olsen's best indie films of 2014

    Throughout the year people you thought you knew showed they were still full of surprises. In 2014, when some would see cinema as a storytelling mode and cultural force as an endangered species, these are vital signs of life. Here is Mark Olsen's top ten list of independent films:

  • Kenneth Turan's best films of 2014
    Kenneth Turan's best films of 2014

    What's the point of doing a 10 best list if you put only 10 films on it?

  • Daring films lifted the artform in 2014
    Daring films lifted the artform in 2014

    Like voices crying in the wilderness — rising above that vast wasteland of movie mediocrity — came the roar of the auteurs in 2014. A rangy group with varying aesthetics, they've left an indelible imprint on cinema despite the 400 or so of the marginal that clogged our theaters...

  • Everyone loses in a December deluge of films
    Everyone loses in a December deluge of films

    I try not to publicly argue with film legends, even those who are no longer alive. But when Mae West famously said that "too much of a good thing can be wonderful," she clearly was not considering a film critic's lot in December.

  • Goodbyes abound in 'Night at the Museum' as trilogy comes to an end
    Goodbyes abound in 'Night at the Museum' as trilogy comes to an end

    "Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb," otherwise known as "Night at the Museum 3," rates as more determinedly heartfelt than the first and not as witty as the second (and best). Also, no Amy Adams as Amelia Earhart in jodhpurs this time around.

Comments
Loading