'Diff'rent Strokes' (1978-1986)

<b>Who they are:</b> Conrad Bain is the rich Phillip Drummond and Dana Plato is his daughter Kimberly. Phillip adopts the young <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PESPT003523" title="Arnold Jackson" href="/topic/sports/arnold-jackson-PESPT003523.topic">Arnold Jackson</a> (<a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB001072" title="Gary Coleman" href="/topic/entertainment/gary-coleman-PECLB001072.topic">Gary Coleman</a>) and his older brother Willis (Todd Bridges) after the loss of the boys' mother, who had worked for Phillip.<br>
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<b>What the kids like:</b> <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ENTTV0000000722" title="Diff'rent Strokes (tv program)" href="/topic/entertainment/television/diffrent-strokes-%28tv-program%29-ENTTV0000000722.topic">"Diff'rent Strokes"</a> used its premise to explore issues of racism and class separation, and humor is often found in the different backgrounds of the children, as Arnold and Willis grew up in Harlem. The brothers were skeptical of their new surroundings at first, but their brotherly relationship soon takes over. After all, it was Coleman who coined the catchphrase,  "What'chu talkin' 'bout, Willis?" The show dealt with the complex, as the headstrong Arnold refused once to divulge his sources for a school paper article in which he wrote about a student drug dealer, and, in a story line stil relevant today, Arnold and Willis debated the pros and cons of getting revenge on a bully.<br>
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<b>What the parents can't get enough of:</b> Phillip is a do-gooder, and takes great pleasure in attempting to rescue Arnold and Willis, and learns plenty about himself along the way.

( Associated Press )

Who they are: Conrad Bain is the rich Phillip Drummond and Dana Plato is his daughter Kimberly. Phillip adopts the young Arnold Jackson (Gary Coleman) and his older brother Willis (Todd Bridges) after the loss of the boys' mother, who had worked for Phillip.

What the kids like: "Diff'rent Strokes" used its premise to explore issues of racism and class separation, and humor is often found in the different backgrounds of the children, as Arnold and Willis grew up in Harlem. The brothers were skeptical of their new surroundings at first, but their brotherly relationship soon takes over. After all, it was Coleman who coined the catchphrase, "What'chu talkin' 'bout, Willis?" The show dealt with the complex, as the headstrong Arnold refused once to divulge his sources for a school paper article in which he wrote about a student drug dealer, and, in a story line stil relevant today, Arnold and Willis debated the pros and cons of getting revenge on a bully.

What the parents can't get enough of: Phillip is a do-gooder, and takes great pleasure in attempting to rescue Arnold and Willis, and learns plenty about himself along the way.

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