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The nominations for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards are out. And the reactions from those deemed worthy are in. "Game of Thrones" has the most chances to win big on Emmy night with a staggering 23 nominations, a major reason that HBO leads the competition with 94 nominations. "The People v. O.J. Simpson" is a close second to "Game of Thrones" with a total of 22 nods, and drama series "Fargo" is in third with 18 noms. Together they helped FX set a record for an ad-supported basic cable network with 56 nominations, up from 38 last year, "Veep" continues to be a large presence at the Emmys with 17 nominations.

And proving that there is truly no limit to Beyoncé's reach, her film "Lemonade" is up for four Emmy awards. Sadly, the new addition to the late-night talk show boys club, Samantha Bee, was snubbed. But other categories were more open, as some were saying, this year it's #EmmysSoDiverse.

Take a detailed look at the nominees by the numbers, read first hand nominee reactions, and see how the internet is celebrating or cursing their favorites.

List of 2016 Emmy nominees

Anthony Anderson and Lauren Graham announce the nominees for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. (Al Seib / LA Times)
Anthony Anderson and Lauren Graham announce the nominees for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. (Al Seib / LA Times)

Here's the full list of nominees for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. What surprises left fans shocked? Who got snubbed? 

Emmy voters bid a fond farewell to 'Downton Abbey'

Michelle Dockery in "Downton Abbey" (Bethany Clarke / For The Times)
Michelle Dockery in "Downton Abbey" (Bethany Clarke / For The Times)

Emmy voters bid a fond farewell to "Downton Abbey" on Thursday, honoring the final season of the costume drama with 10 nominations, including a fifth nod for drama series. 

Though previous nominees from the cast, including Michelle Dockery and Jim Carter, were overlooked this time around, perennial favorite Maggie Smith was once again recognized in the supporting actress in a drama category.  

"I’m thrilled and amazed and honoured that the show has been so generously recognized in its final year. It’s a wonderful goodbye for everyone involved," writer and creator Julian Fellowes said in a statement. 

Executive producer Gareth Neame also cheered the news, calling it "an incredible way to say goodbye" and thanking the members of the Television Academy for "embracing and honoring 'Downton Abbey' from the beginning."

This year's nods bring "Downton Abbey's" total haul to 69 Primetime Emmy nominations over the course of six seasons. 

 

 

 

HBO still leads the Emmys race but for how long?

Julia Louis-Dreyfus of of HBO's "Veep" after last year's Emmys. (Jason Kempin / Getty Images)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus of of HBO's "Veep" after last year's Emmys. (Jason Kempin / Getty Images)

The shifts in the TV landscape brought on by online video streaming are more apparent than ever in the nominations for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards announced Thursday.

HBO dominated the competition with 94 nominations — the most of any network for the 16th consecutive year — for the awards presented by the Television Academy. But its total was down from the 126 it received in 2015, a sign of how streaming services — as well as other cable outlets — have upped their game in the scripted programming arena.

One significant indicator of the new TV world order: Three out of the seven nominees in the comedy series category — “Master of None” and “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” both on Netflix, and Amazon’s “Transparent” — are only available through online viewing. Broadcast networks had dominated the category as recently as 2011, but this year only ABC was represented with “black-ish” and “Modern Family.” The commercial broadcasters have not had a series nominated for drama series since that same year.

Analysis: What the Emmy nominations say about this moment in time

"Game of Thrones" and "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story" (Handout)
"Game of Thrones" and "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story" (Handout)

The real message of this year’s nominations is remarkably clear: The best television turns vague social notions and ill-defined personal feelings into vividly specific stories and increasingly, it does it in real time. 

TV critic Mary McNamara on the 2016 Emmy nominations
Hugh Laurie in "The Night Manager." (Des Willie / AMC)
Hugh Laurie in "The Night Manager." (Des Willie / AMC)

I am so pleased and proud for 'The Night Manager.'  I plan on being impossible for at least a week.

Hugh Laurie, on receiving an Emmy nomination for supporting actor in a limited series for his role in "The Night Manager"

Emmy voters snub Samantha Bee and other deserving women

 (Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)
(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Shortly before Samantha Bee’s essential late-night talk show, “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee,” premiered this year on TBS, Vanity Fair published a story spotlighting “all the titans of late-night television.” The group of 10 talk show hosts was entirely male and made up of the usual suspects — Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel, Bill Maher, among them — and also included Trevor Noah, who hadn’t yet taken the reins at “The Daily Show.”

That tired boys club scenario was shockingly repeated Thursday as Emmy voters ignored Bee’s bold, electrifying series in favor of a show in which Jerry Seinfeld drives around with his celebrity pals in fancy cars to grab a cup of coffee.

Bee was not the only strong, interesting woman overlooked.

With O.J. Simpson nominations, Emmy voters hold up a period-piece mirror

Sterling K. Brown as Christopher Darden (left) and Cuba Gooding Jr. as O.J. Simpson (middle). (Ray Mickshaw / FX)
Sterling K. Brown as Christopher Darden (left) and Cuba Gooding Jr. as O.J. Simpson (middle). (Ray Mickshaw / FX)

It was the crime that rocked the country in the 1990s.

In 2016, it rocked television.

The killings of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, for which O.J. Simpson was acquitted of murder in 1995, solidified its status as the television event of the moment when a scripted dramatization of the case on Thursday walked away with a load of Emmy nominations.

FX’s “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” garnered 22 nominations from the Television Academy, the second-most of any series. Those nods included the top category of outstanding limited series and six acting nominations, for the likes of Courtney B. Vance as Johnnie Cochran, Sarah Paulson as Marcia Clark and Cuba Gooding Jr. as Simpson. In the supporting actor in a limited series category, performers from the show composed half the field.

The nominations bring the O.J. case to a kind of entertainment closure even as its underlying issues still dominate the headlines. Together with Ezra Edelman's 7.5-hour docuseries "O.J.: Made in America," which became a sensation when ESPN aired it last month, they suggest that the Los Angeles trial remains at the fore of national consciousness.

'The Night Manager' director Susanne Bier on her show earning 12 Emmy nominations

'The Night Manager' (Des Willie / The Ink Factory / AMC)
'The Night Manager' (Des Willie / The Ink Factory / AMC)

What are you doing to celebrate?
It’s the kind of thing you just walk around being happy and proud and honored. I don’t need to do anything specific. I might open a bottle of champagne. It’s more just really gratifying.

Would you direct another six-hour series? Or even something longer?

I think I might need a little break before I do it again, but I would love to. It’s so interesting because you get into details that, coming from feature films, you can’t allow yourself that level of detailing for minor characters. When you do six hours, there is space to be detailed about that.

You are in Cuba today. Were you watching the nominations online?

I was watching online. I was trying not to get too involved in it. There’s an element of self-preservation where you try to not be too anxious or excited, and then you can’t help yourself anyway.

Directors have traditionally played second fiddle to writers in TV. Does it feel like that’s changing?

I definitely think it’s changing. When you do something that’s six hours, there’s a definitely a directorial vision which you have to have. Otherwise you can’t do a job like that. I also think that the audiences are becoming way more aware of the visuals, the music, all those kinds of things which are also part of the direction.

There’s so much choice [in TV], it needs to be brilliant, it needs to be seductive. I think [the idea of] playing second fiddle to the writers, was more real or truthful at a time when television was more just people talking. At this point in time, I find television just as interesting and stimulating as anything else.

Tracee Ellis Ross, Emmy-nominee, on filming the 'Good Times' finale for 'black-ish'

The only person who may have been more excited about Tracee Ellis Ross being nominated for lead actress in a comedy series was her "black-ish" co-star Anthony Anderson, who read the 2016 nominations with actress Lauren Graham and screamed her name.

Ross sat with critic Mary McNamara earlier this year to talk about the show's finale and the important recently completed season.

Amy Schumer was nominated for an Emmy but she's really pulling for Tatiana Maslany, like the rest of the Internet

In what has become a sort of Emmys tradition, lead actress in a comedy nominee Amy Schumer took to Twitter to express her enthusiasm that Tatiana Maslany is also up for an Emmy award.

Of course, just as enthusiastic were the "Orphan Black" fans that celebrated Maslany's lead actress in a drama nomination in true Clone Club fashion. 

Watch: The 10 biggest Emmy snubs

Constance Zimmer, nominated for her role in 'UnREAL,' sees similarities between her show and actual reality TV

Constance Zimmer must face three "Game of Thrones" actresses, Maggie Smith and Maura Tierney as a nominee for supporting actress in a drama series for her role in "UnREAL."

Earlier this year, Zimmer came to The Times to talk about the show, her character (Quinn King) and the supportive community of Lifetime.

Emmy-nominated Anna Chlumsky on how 'Veep' helps thicken her skin

 (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)
(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

Nominated for outstanding supporting actress in a comedy for the fourth consecutive year, "Veep" star Anna Chlumsky could be forgiven for taking Emmy season in stride. Below, she talks about her plans and how the cast absorbs all those insults on "Veep."

How are you celebrating?

I haven’t even really thought about it. I’m really, really surprised. The nice thing is I already have a date night set up with my husband. I guess that’s how. I’m going to get a manicure. I think I’m allowed a manicure.

The writers on “Veep” keep finding new ways to humiliate Selina Meyer [Julia Louis-Dreyfus].

It does make you a little concerned for people’s psyches that they have this well of inspiration for the pathos of these characters. But we’re grateful for it.

Obviously you guys spend a lot of time insulting each other. Does it ever get under your skin?

I know that the ones that tend to physical are the hardest. There was a line in Season 2 where I think that Dan said that Amy was gaining weight. Things like that, poor Tim [Simons] had to deal with that a lot. None of us are safe. But that kind of gets us into a nice and open head-space because we just know that anyone is fair game. It really does help thicken the skin in your normal life having gone through the dialogue on the show.

Aziz Ansari was nominated for three Emmys for "Master of None." (Jesse Dittmar / For The Times)
Aziz Ansari was nominated for three Emmys for "Master of None." (Jesse Dittmar / For The Times)

I'm bummed the medium-sized dragon in 'Game of Thrones' got snubbed in best supporting but happy to see 'Master of None' and our entire team get acknowledged. We are thrilled!

Aziz Ansari, nominated for best actor in a comedy, comedy directing and comedy writing for 'Master of None.' The show also was nominated for comedy series.

This year it's #EmmySoDiverse

Cuba Gooding Jr. plays O.J. Simpson in "American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson." (FX)
Cuba Gooding Jr. plays O.J. Simpson in "American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson." (FX)

The takeaway for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards could very well be #EmmySoDiverse.

Nominations for the awards, announced Thursday, went to racially charged dramas such as “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” “Roots,” “American Crime” and the movies “Confirmation” and “All The Way.”“

Comedies with sharp-edged observations about race, such as ABC’s ‘black-ish” and Netflix’s “Master of None,” also received several key nominations, including best comedy, where they will compete against more mainstream favorites such as “Modern Family” and “Veep.”

In contrast with this year’s Oscars, which became embroiled in controversy over the lack of nominations for people of color, Emmy nominations provided a wealth of recognition for minorities, particularly African Americans.

'Game of Thrones' and 'People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' lead Emmy nominations

Kit Harington in "Game of Thrones," which received 23 nominations. (HBO)
Kit Harington in "Game of Thrones," which received 23 nominations. (HBO)

While HBO remained a dominant force in the 68th Emmy Awards nominations, the changing TV landscape brought on by online streaming services were reflected in the contenders announced Wednesday.

Led by its enduring hit series “Game of Thrones” — which received the most nominations of any program with 23 — HBO was the most recognized network overall with 94, but the figure was down from the 126 it received in 2015.

Streaming service Netflix received 54 nominations, a gain of 20 over last year. Its signature series “House of Cards” scored 13 nominations, tying its previous high in 2014.

FX, which had the most critically hailed and talked about program of the year in “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story," had the most nominations of any ad-supported network at 56, up from 38 last year. “The People v. O.J. Simpson” received 22 nominations, the most for any limited series or miniseries.

NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” received 16 nominations, tying its previous record for a variety program, which the long-running series set in 2011.

Which shows and networks got the most nominations?

BY SHOW

“Game of Thrones” – 23

“The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” – 22

“Fargo” – 18

“Veep” – 17

“Saturday Night Live” – 16

“House of Cards” – 13

“The Night Manager” – 12

“Silicon Valley”— 11

“Downton Abbey”— 10

“Grease: Live” – 10

“Transparent” – 10

“All the Way” – 8

“American Horror Story: Hotel” – 8

“Dancing With the Stars” – 8

“Better Call Saul” – 7

“The Big Bang Theory” – 7

“Key & Peele” – 7

“Roots” – 7

“Making a Murderer” – 6

“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” – 6

“Mr. Robot”- 6

“Penny Dreadful” – 6

BY NETWORK

HBO – 94

FX Networks – 56

Netflix – 54

NBC – 41

ABC – 35

CBS – 35

FOX- 29

PBS – 26

AMC – 24

Showtime – 22

Comedy Central – 17

Amazon – 16

History – 13

A&E – 12

 

Actor Keegan-Michael Key has been nominated for three Emmys, including two for the series "Key & Peele." (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)
Actor Keegan-Michael Key has been nominated for three Emmys, including two for the series "Key & Peele." (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

“I am so pleased to hear this morning’s news, and especially for the show. Once again our amazing staff and crew has been recognized for their countless hours of hard work, and there is no team more deserving. What a great way to celebrate the end of 'Key & Peele.' The whole thing fills my heart with joy.”

Keegan-Michael Key, nominated as supporting actor in a comedy series and as part of the writing staff for 'Key & Peele.' He was also nominated for voice-over work on the animated show 'SuperMansion.'
Rami Malek stars in "Mr. Robot." (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Rami Malek stars in "Mr. Robot." (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

“I couldn’t be more honored to receive this nomination. To be included among the list of actors whose work I’ve admired for years is truly humbling. I’m so grateful for the brilliant Sam Esmail who brought Elliot to life and has allowed me to play a role one could only dream of. Thank you to the cast, crew, USA Network and Universal Cable Productions.  And, of course, to the Academy.”

Rami Malek star of 'Mr. Robot' and an Emmy nominee for lead actor in a drama series
Christian Slater and Rami Malek appear in a scene from "Mr. Robot." (Christopher Saunders / USA Network)
Christian Slater and Rami Malek appear in a scene from "Mr. Robot." (Christopher Saunders / USA Network)

The entire team at 'Mr. Robot' is thrilled with our nominations this morning. Today is officially Shoot Day 80 for Season 2 and we couldn’t be happier to hear the news from set. We are humbled and honored to be in the company of such innovative, groundbreaking storytelling. On behalf of the cast and crew who continue to work tirelessly to make this show, as well as USA Network and Universal Cable Productions, thank you to the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Sam Esmail, executive producer and creator of 'Mr. Robot,' which was nominated for Emmys for outstanding drama series and outstanding writing for a drama series

Tony Hale, nominated for 'Veep,' doesn't want to get used to being a nominee

Tony Hale, nominated as supporting actor in a comedy series for HBO's "Veep," stopped by the Los Angeles Times earlier this year to talk about the show, his character ( Gary Walsh) and winning in the category previously.

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