What if Oscar's red carpet looked like New York Fashion Week?

A plea for more daring fashion on the Academy Awards red carpet

The Oscars red carpet is usually dominated by European fashion houses such as Dior, Chanel and Givenchy, because they have the resources to sign actresses to lucrative fragrance deals and dressing contracts, and the  couture workrooms where months can be spent creating custom gowns.

There have been exceptions, of course, such as the memorable bubble gum pink Ralph Lauren gown worn by Gwyneth Paltrow in 1999; the icy silver metallic Carolina Herrera worn by Renee Zellweger in 2008; and the fringed silver Oscar de la Renta gown worn by Jennifer Garner last year.

Which got us thinking: what came down the runways during New York Fashion Week that we wouldn’t mind seeing on the Oscars red carpet?

It would be a big coup for someone to wear a look from Peter Copping’s first Oscar de la Renta collection, for one.

I’d also love to see almost anything from the Marchesa runway. The label was established in 2004 by British designers Karen Craig and Georgina Chapman (who is married to Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein), and it used to be a big player on the red carpet, though not so much lately. The collection the designers showed in New York was full of fresh ideas (inspired by an exotic, opium haze, they said), including a way-cool pants outfit with a jet black beaded and fringed top and jaw-dropping bare back that would look amazing on the right daredevil celeb.

But sadly, there’s not a lot of risk taking on the Oscars red carpet. Again, if there were, I’d love to see someone wearing one of Narciso Rodriguez’s finale looks, such as the white silk, bias-cut top that spiraled into a formal wear-type tail—a new kind of creative black tie.

Or, for the ultimate thumb in the eye to armchair fashion critics, how about a pair of Michael Kors’ crystal-covered silk pajamas?

Take that, fashion police.

Click through the gallery for more Oscar-ready red-carpet styles from New York Fashion Week.



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