Daily Dish

50 food challenges in 50 states: Anyone feel like an 8-pound grilled cheese?

The following is not for the faint of heart, or for those who just like to nibble. 

There's a website devoted to a food challenge in every state. From ghost-pepper-topped pizza to a 15-pound burger, there's a melt-your-face-off spicy or so-big-you-need-new-sweatpants challenge for the Adam Richman in all of us.

The website features an interactive map that highlights a single food challenge in each of the 50 states. For California, it's at Fat Sal's, the Hollywood sandwich shop known for serving subs tall enough to go on all the big-kid rides at Disneyland. 

It's a 27-inch garlic roll topped with cheesesteak, cheeseburgers, pastrami, chicken fingers, bacon, mozzarella sticks, fried eggs, jalapeno poppers, fries, onion rings and "a load of sauce." If you finish this bad boy in 40 minutes or less, you get to create and name your own sandwich. You also get this one for free.  

In South Carolina, it's all about the spicy tuna hand rolls. At Bushido Japanese Restaurant, the challenge involves eating 10 sushi rolls, with each roll hotter than the next. There's an entire habanero pepper hiding in roll No. 9. Finish the challenge and you get your picture on the restaurant's wall of fame, a headband and a $25 gift certificate you can use on a future trip to the restaurant. 

If you visit Cheesie's Pub 7 Grub in Illinois, you can order an 8-pound grilled cheese. Finish this five-layer sandwich and you go home with a champ T-shirt, a picture on the restaurant's website, a $100 gift certificate and two hours of free beer to drink as soon as you finish the sandwich. 

Still hungry? You can see all 50 challenges at www.canvasfactory.com

Sometimes a cheeseball, but I like it. Follow me on Twitter @Jenn_Harris_

ALSO

The McRib is back! But how do you find it?

5 great fish tacos in L.A., and why you need to drive to La Puente

A ramen slurpfest, two cocktail events, plus Champagne and polo

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times
Loading
71°