Raw Food Diet

HealthDiets and DietingHeart Disease

Food is one of life's pleasures, but it can also be like a drug.


"I actually felt a physical pull to food when I saw something I couldn't help myself." Two years ago Dallas resident Miranda Martinez reached her breaking point. "I had completely given up I was 200 pounds."


Now she is 66 pounds lighter and credits the weight loss to a raw food diet. "Raw food has been able to clarify my mind."


Paul Nison is a leading authority on the subject. He's written 8 books on the raw food diet and is in town to lecture on the lifestyle.


"When you cook foods it takes always a lot of the nutrients and that's where the problems start."


18 years ago Nison was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Doctors said nothing could be done.


"I went on this raw food diet and I got completely better from this so called incurable illness."


The diet is based on unprocessed uncooked plant food. Proponents believe it increases energy, helps with digestion and heart disease.


At Bliss, North Texas only raw food restaurant, patrons can sample, pizza, burgers, soup even dessert.


Anything that is heated in this kitchen is done at a temperature of a 115 degrees F or less.


"That bun consistency or taco bell consistency or crackers they are dehydrated so they are heated and it dries them out to a degree that they can hold together, " says restaurant manager Maria Whitworth.


For Miranda, the diet has given her a new outlook on life. "I felt like I could really have control of my life control of my eating habits."


Paul Nison has written 8 books on the raw food diet. On Friday, June 19 Nison will speak in Fort Worth at the Baker Blvd Family Chiropractic Center at 7:00 PM.


7201 Baker Blvd Ste C-1


Richland Hills, TX 76118


For More Information and R.S.V.P. Contact: Scott and Lissa 817-880-4300 or 817-595-9206 rawcheflissa@hotmail.com

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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