"Glee" Racks Up 19 Emmy Nominations

EntertainmentDrama (genre)Arts and CultureLiteratureMusicFamilyGlee (tv program)

"Glee," the spunky TV musical comedy about high school misfits and the teachers who shepherd them, was a top Emmy nominee Thursday with 19 bids, including for best comedy series and stars Matthew Morrison and Lea Michele.

The leading nominee was the gritty, unsparing World War II drama, "The Pacific," with 24 nominations.

Conan O'Brien is gone from "The Tonight Show" but his short tenure as host is not forgotten: The late-night show with him at the helm nabbed a nomination as best variety, music or comedy series, while resurrected Jay Leno was snubbed in the category.

David Letterman's "Late Show" also was missing from the category, after a season in which the host turned an admission of affairs with female staffers and a blackmail attempt into high broadcast drama.

Besides "Glee," other newcomers receiving Emmy recognition include "Modern Family," with nods for best comedy series and for five members of its ensemble cast, and "The Good Wife," a nominee for best drama and recognition for star Julianna Margulies.

The final season of "Lost" garnered nominations for best drama series and a nod for star Matthew Fox and supporting nominations for Terry O'Quinn and Michael Emerson. Elizabeth Mitchell received a guest actress bid for the drama.

"Saturday Night Live" received 12 nominations for a total 126 nominations during its run, surpassing the "ER" all-time record of 124 bids. One of the nominations went to Betty White, who at 88 proved you're never too old for comedy when she hosted the show to big ratings and applause.

Besides "Glee" and "Modern Family," other nominees for best comedy series include "Curb Your Enthusiasm," "Nurse Jackie," "The Office" and last year's winner, "30 Rock," with its third consecutive bid in the category.

Joining "Lost" and "The Good Wife" as best drama series nominees were "Breaking Bad," "Dexter," "True Blood" and "Mad Men," which won the award for the past two seasons.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Comments
Loading