Alan Zarembo

Writer

Alan Zarembo is an assistant foreign editor. He has also been a projects and investigative reporter with a focus on medicine, science and the military. Prior to joining the Los Angeles Times in 2003, he was the Mexico City bureau chief for Newsweek magazine and a freelance journalist based in central Africa. He is graduate of Dartmouth College, a former Knight Fellow at Stanford University and a winner of the Livingston Award for International Reporting.

Recent Articles

  • Mexicans shovel out after Hurricane Patricia

    Mexicans shovel out after Hurricane Patricia

    A rusty sign at the entrance of this town declares a population of 31,850 people and an elevation of 20 meters — about 60 feet — above sea level. The town sits about nine miles inland from the Pacific Ocean. But the waves were not the problem here early Saturday. It was the river. Just after midnight,...

  • Pentagon bars University of Phoenix from recruiting on military bases

    Pentagon bars University of Phoenix from recruiting on military bases

    The Pentagon has temporarily barred the University of Phoenix from recruiting students at U.S. military bases and cut off tuition assistance for new active-duty troops — a blow to the nation's largest private university.The move comes as the for-profit college giant, one of the largest recipients...

  • New tool can identify soldiers most likely to commit violent crimes, study shows

    New tool can identify soldiers most likely to commit violent crimes, study shows

    In the science fiction thriller “Minority Report,” a police force known as PreCrime uses mutated human psychics to identify criminals before they act. The U.S. Army is working toward a similar goal — not by reading minds but by crunching data. Using the military records of all 975,057 soldiers...

  • Nostalgia is served up at reopened Clifton's cafeteria

    Nostalgia is served up at reopened Clifton's cafeteria

    It wasn't yet dinnertime, but the line outside Clifton's cafeteria Sunday stretched half a block. The wait for a meal was running about an hour. The bottleneck turned out to be the meat station. But Alma Sevilla, angling for a $12 plate of turkey, wasn't bothered. "When you grew up [going] here,...

  • Pope's secret meeting with Kim Davis disappoints supporters of same-sex marriage

    Pope's secret meeting with Kim Davis disappoints supporters of same-sex marriage

    Pope Francis invigorated the Roman Catholic Church on his U.S. visit last week by focusing his public message on global issues while treading lightly in the culture wars of America. But while he spoke out on climate change, immigration and poverty, his private agenda included a meeting with Kim...

  • With Pope Francis, Catholicism has a new brand -- an everyman's pope

    With Pope Francis, Catholicism has a new brand -- an everyman's pope

    Among the memorable images from Pope Francis' visit to the United States are the pontiff addressing Congress, celebrating Mass at Madison Square Garden and standing before Independence Hall. Then there's the black Fiat hatchback. The 1.4-liter model 500L starts at $19,345 and gets 33 miles per...

  • Pope Francis through a U.S. Catholic prism

    Pope Francis through a U.S. Catholic prism

    Pope Francis in his first trip to the United States has spoken boldly about the need for change — in the way we treat the environment, immigrants and the poorest among us. With messages that resonated beyond those of his faith, he seemed well aware that the future of Roman Catholicism may depend...

  • A day of firsts: Pope Francis' visit to Washington

    A day of firsts: Pope Francis' visit to Washington

    It was a day of firsts for U.S. Catholics, as the first pope from Latin America spent his first full day ever in the United States, presiding over his first Mass here — and canonizing the 18th century missionary known as the Apostle of California. Massive, roaring crowds lined the streets as Pope...

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