Laura King

Writer

Laura King is the Cairo bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. She started for The Times in Jerusalem in 2002 and moved to Istanbul four years later to take on a regional beat that included coverage of Pakistan and Afghanistan. In 2009, she moved to Kabul to report on the Afghan conflict full-time. Before joining The Times, Laura was a correspondent for the Associated Press in Washington, Tokyo and London. She is a graduate of UC-Davis and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Oregon.

Recent Articles

  • Israeli prime minister rejects U.S. criticism of 'excessive' force

    Israeli prime minister rejects U.S. criticism of 'excessive' force

    Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responded angrily Thursday to U.S. suggestions that Israel might be using excessive force in response to a series of stabbing attacks by Palestinians, saying any other nation would respond in a similar manner. Israeli officials also refuted claims by Palestinians...

  • Israel sends soldiers into cities to bolster security

    Israel sends soldiers into cities to bolster security

    Spurred by weeks of bloodshed, Israel on Wednesday announced the rare deployment of soldiers alongside police in cities across the country, set up checkpoints in some neighborhoods in traditionally Arab east Jerusalem and pressed ahead with plans to punish the families of Palestinian attackers....

  • Palestinian-Israeli violence raises talk of a new intifada

    Palestinian-Israeli violence raises talk of a new intifada

    Stabbings, shootings, a bus commandeered, cars rammed into crowds: Violent attacks by Palestinians against Israelis and a full-throated Israeli security response are intensifying by the day. But is this a new intifada?The question is a consequential one. The two sustained Palestinian uprisings...

  • Nobel Peace Prize goes to civil groups that kept democracy alive in Tunisia

    Nobel Peace Prize goes to civil groups that kept democracy alive in Tunisia

    Nearly five years on, the once high hopes for the Arab Spring -- popular revolts that swept a Middle East long dominated by authoritarian rule -- have withered to a husk. But the small North African nation of Tunisia is seen as the region’s principal democratic success, if an imperiled one. The...

  • 'We want to escape but we fear the sea': Exile in Egypt

    'We want to escape but we fear the sea': Exile in Egypt

    The lemons here are not as large and sweet, the olive oil not as fragrant, the parsley not as fresh as that plucked from herb gardens at home in Syria. But they will do what they can with it, they concede at last. Another day of cooking together unfurls like a sail before them, and from this moment,...

  • Migrant crisis playing into the hands of Germany's extremists

    Migrant crisis playing into the hands of Germany's extremists

    When anti-immigrant chants echo off the splendid, ornate buildings of this bustling city on the River Elbe, Dresden's residents are, for the most part, mortified. Many here insist that flamboyant outbursts of fury directed at the wave of migrants and refugees reaching Europe's shores this year...

  • Stampede at Saudi hajj kills 717, leading to question: Why again?

    Stampede at Saudi hajj kills 717, leading to question: Why again?

    How could it have happened again? Anguished relatives and stunned pilgrims demanded answers after at least 717 people were killed and 805 injured Thursday in a crushing crowd outside the holy city of Mecca, according to Saudi Arabia’s civil defense directorate. The stampede occurred in Mina, close...

  • 'A beacon of hope': Kerry says U.S. will take in more refugees

    'A beacon of hope': Kerry says U.S. will take in more refugees

    Secretary of State John F. Kerry pledged Sunday that the United States would increase the number of refugees it accepts to 100,000 in 2017 — a substantial increase, although only about an eighth of the number Germany expects to take in this year.“This step is in keeping with America's best tradition...

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