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Santa Barbara and Ventura counties:

  • Evacuations: Residents in burn zones in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties were ordered to leave.
  • Road closures: The unincorporated areas of Santa Barbara County, Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria: North of Hwy. 192 to the U.S. Forest Service Boundary; East of Cold Springs Road to Toro Canyon Road on the West. South of Hwy 192 to the ocean; East of Sycamore Canyon Road/Hot Springs Road/Oak Road/Olive Mill to Ortega Ridge Road on the West.
  • Southbound Highway 101 is closed from Milpas Street to Padaro Lane between Camarillo to Carpinteria. Northbound Highway 101 is closed from Highway 150 to Milpas Street. Highway 192 is closed in multiple locations.
  • Island Packers in Ventura and Condor Express in Santa Barbara are offering ferry services between the cities. Amtrak has restarted Surfliner and Coast Starlight service between Santa Barbara and Oxnard.
  • Santa Barbara County fire officials have rescued several people trapped in debris flows on Hot Springs Road in Montecito. At least 20 people have died in the Montecito area. As of Monday afternoon, up to three people were still missing. Approximately 100 homes were destroyed and 300 were damaged in the mudslides.

Los Angeles County:

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At least four people remain missing Monday as the grim effort to find bodies under tons of mud and debris continued in Montecito.

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As the death toll in the Montecito mudslides increased to 19 on Saturday, officials announced that the 101 Freeway would remain closed indefinitely.

Peter Fleurat and his partner, Lalo Barajas, wanted to ride out the storm together.

Los Angeles firefighter Hollyn Bullock.
Los Angeles firefighter Hollyn Bullock. (Louis Sahagun / Los Angeles Times)

In the 27 years since joining the Los Angeles Fire Department, Hollyn Bullock has reported for search-and-rescue duty for tragedies like the World Trade Center terrorist attack in New York, Hurricane Katrina and the deadly train derailment in Chatsworth that claimed 25 lives.

On Friday, the veteran firefighter joined a team scouring through the wreckage of the latest disaster. Seventeen people were dead after mudslides tore through the Santa Barbara County community of Montecito. At least five remained missing.

And so, along a sodden, debris-tangled corner just east of the 101 Freeway, Bullock and others searched on.

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The number of people still missing in the wake of a deadly mudslide in Montecito now figures at five, officials said Friday morning.

Santa Barbara County crews worked through the holidays to defend coastal communities from the second half of Southern California's familiar cycle of fire and flood.

Boulders, logs and a carpet of mud in front of a house along San Ysidro Creek near East Valley Road in Montecito.
Boulders, logs and a carpet of mud in front of a house along San Ysidro Creek near East Valley Road in Montecito. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

Late Monday, Josie Gower stacked two rows of sandbags around her home in Montecito and settled in for the night.

Her home on East Valley Road was in the voluntary evacuation zone for the storm expected to sweep through the area.

Gower was not concerned. She told her family that she had weathered worse than the storm she believed was on its way, including the Thomas fire — the largest in California’s recorded history — just one month before.

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  • Santa Barbara County
  • Ventura County

The Thomas fire began its destructive march 30 miles east of Montecito on Dec. 4. Two weeks later, the blaze had begun to bear down on the city, eventually leaving fire-scarred hillsides prone to deadly mudflows.

Thomas fire progression

The Thomas fire became California's largest wildfire on record, burning more than 280,000 acres across Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

(Raoul Ranoa / @latimesgraphics)
  • Santa Barbara County
Neighbors help an 88-year-old woman, Gloria Hebert, evacuate her Montecito home.
Neighbors help an 88-year-old woman, Gloria Hebert, evacuate her Montecito home.

On Wednesday morning, Liana Mortazavi, 49, sat in the frame of the back door of the duplex where her mom has lived for nearly 40 years along Olive Mill Road.

She had driven from San Jose on Tuesday night and slogged her way through mud with a childhood friend to reach her 88-year-old mother, Gloria Hebert.

The front door was blocked by a tree, mud and debris. When they got inside the house, they pushed up a couch against the front door to keep more mud from seeping in. When Mortazavi measured the mud around the house where she'd grown up, she said there was 14-1/2 inches all around the house.