Los Angeles Times

The politics of national defense

Does Congress sniff around too much in the military's business? What to make of Adm. Fallon — a heroic voice of dissent in a war-mongering administration, or an errant officer who couldn't keep his own views to himself? All week, Iraq war veteran Phillip Carter and former Assistant Defense Secretary Lawrence J. Korb discuss instances in which politics and national defense collide.

  • Fighting governments and guerrillas

    What kind of military does the U.S. need -- one optimized for big wars against a nation like China, or built for smaller wars like Iraq and Afghanistan? Phillip Carter and Lawrence J. Korb discuss.

  • Buying American

    Does Congress have a duty to ensure military contracts go to domestic firms? Lawrence J. Korb and Phillip Carter debate.

  • Torture in the court

    Should evidence gleaned via torture be admissible against defendants being held at Guantanamo? Phillip Carter and Lawrence J. Korb discuss.

  • Free speech for officers?

    Was Adm. Fallon a heroic check on a warmongering administration or an errant officer who couldn’t keep his opinions to himself? Should military brass have the power to control their message, or should they fall in line with their civilian commanders? Lawrence J. Korb and Phillip Carter discuss.

  • The politics of defense

    Generally, should Congress keep its nose out of military business in all but the most extreme cases, or should it instead exercise stronger oversight? All week, Phillip Carter and Lawrence J. Korb debate.

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