Los Angeles Times

Meghan Daum

Columnist

Meghan Daum was born in California and grew up primarily on the East Coast. She is the author of four books, most recently a collection of original essays, “The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion.” Her other books include the cult favorite essay collection “My Misspent Youth,” as well as a novel and a memoir. She is also the editor of “Selfish, Shallow & Self-Absorbed: Sixteen Writers on the Decision Not to Have Kids,” which will be published in the spring of 2015. Daum has written for numerous magazines, including the New Yorker, Harper’s and Vogue, and contributed to the public radio programs “Morning Edition,” “Marketplace” and “This American Life.” Her column has run on the Op-Ed page since 2005. Learn more about her at meghandaum.com.

Recent Articles

  • Curvy or no, Barbie is still a mean girl

    Curvy or no, Barbie is still a mean girl

    Never mind the prospect of a woman in the White House. Last week saw what some are calling the most important feminist development of our time: Mattel's release of “Curvy Barbie,” a doll whose wider hips and sturdier thighs are being held up as an antidote to the anatomically impossible proportions...

  • Yes, millennials, Hillary Clinton is a feminist

    Yes, millennials, Hillary Clinton is a feminist

    It doesn't take a lot to make me feel old these days, and when I hear millennials attack Hillary Clinton for not being feminist enough, I can practically feel my bone density diminishing. I understand that today's feminism — sometimes called “fourth wave” feminism — has different contours and concerns...

  • Are we making too much of 'Making a Murderer'?

    Are we making too much of 'Making a Murderer'?

    If you haven't fallen down the rabbit hole of “Making a Murderer,” the 10-part, true-crime Netflix binge-athon that has spawned petitions for a retrial or presidential pardons as well as endless dinner party chatter, allow me to give you a gentle shove. In 1986, a Wisconsin man named Steven Avery...

  • 2015: The most hyperbolic year ever

    2015: The most hyperbolic year ever

    It's the end of the year, when newspaper columnists are supposed to fill in the blank — “2015 was the year of _______ ” — and decide whether the phenomenon in question falls into the category of “good thing” or “good riddance.” This year, however, so much of what happened has been framed as larger-than-life,...

  • Forget 'bleeding heart' liberals, the GOP is now the party of feelings

    Forget 'bleeding heart' liberals, the GOP is now the party of feelings

    The term “bleeding heart liberal” sounds musty and outdated, a relic of a time when slogans like “Save the whales” were code for “Worry about everything” and the words “drone strike” conjured up sci-fi, not a progressive president. Still, bleeding heart imagery is emblematic of the associations...

  • Eat, shop, click: Another kind of Black Friday

    Eat, shop, click: Another kind of Black Friday

    How great is technology? It can cure diseases, send humans into space and ensure that we never have to set foot in a Wal-Mart or Best Buy again if we don't want to. On Black Friday, the day we flock to big box stores to save money on flat-screen TVs, that can be a matter of public safety. Every...

  • The tantrums at Mizzou and Yale reveal more than PC problems

    The tantrums at Mizzou and Yale reveal more than PC problems

    At the University of Missouri, it took a hunger-striking student and the threat of a football boycott to get the president and chancellor to step down amid long-standing campus racial tensions. At Yale, it took a viral YouTube video of an angry student upbraiding a faculty member to get the university's...

  • Sanders and Clinton: What's all the shouting about?

    Sanders and Clinton: What's all the shouting about?

    When Bernie Sanders used the word "shouting" during the Democratic presidential debate, he was referring to the tone of the gun control debate, not his opponent Hillary Rodham Clinton. Despite how obvious this was, Clinton (or perhaps her advisors) began slowly re-purposing the word as a sexist...

91°