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  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
(Getty Images)

Last week, the Trump administration announced it would roll back President Obama's protections for transgender students, which let them use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice.

The administration's stated reasoning was that these questions are best handled locally.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) wrote a letter to DeVos Tuesday asking that she commit to issuing new guidelines for protecting LGBT students

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(Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

A raft of recent studies about school vouchers couldn’t have come at a worse time for new Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

That's because the studies report devastatingly bad results for students in those voucher programs. And they've been flowing into public forums just as DeVos, a leading advocate of school vouchers, takes charge of federal education policy. DeVos's patron, President Trump, proposed during his campaign to shovel $20 billion to the states to support magnet and charter schools in voucher programs.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
  • Charter Schools
(Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California: 

Nationwide: 

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

UC Riverside ranks among the nation's best universities in promoting African American student success, a new study has found. 

The University of California campus of 23,000 students was singled out as one of the top 18 universities for African Americans among 676 public and private nonprofit institutions examined in the study by the Education Trust, a Washington-based education policy organization.

The Inland Empire campus — the only California institution among the top performers — had relatively high African American graduation rates, no achievement gap between blacks and whites, and far better results than comparable universities, the study found.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
(Chuck Burton / Associated Press)

President Trump announced steps toward creating a national school voucher program during his speech to Congress on  Tuesday night. 

"I am calling upon members of both parties to pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of African American and Latino children," Trump said. "These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school that is right for them."

Trump didn't provide details, but experts have said that the most likely way to do this at a national level would be through a tax credit program. 

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
A protest over handling of sexual harrassment at UCLA.
A protest over handling of sexual harrassment at UCLA. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times)

The San Jose Mercury News requested the University of California's records on employee sexual misconduct. Records covering more than three years were released by the 10 campuses today.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12

A nude photograph of an East Bay school administrator that was being circulated by students has led to multiple suspensions and an expulsion at a high school in Concord, according to local news outlets.  

The photo reportedly shows a high-ranking school administrator at an off-campus gym, NBC Bay Area reported. The picture was circulated around Clayton Valley Charter High School and led to searches of students’ phones.

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
  • Charter Schools
Applying to popular schools, such as the Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, could get easier.
Applying to popular schools, such as the Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, could get easier. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

For years, sophisticated middle- and upper-middle-class parents have worked out something like a secret science to sort, choose and get their children into the best schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District.

The district hasn't made finding schools and comparing them easy.

Starting next fall, however, navigating the system should get simpler for all concerned.

  • K-12
(Los Angeles Times)

The vast majority of Snapchat users are 13 to 34 years old, with 18- to 24-year-olds making up the largest segment. The Times interviewed six of them — high school and college students involved in its High School Insider program — to find out what gets them to open the app and what turns them off.

These teen users are valuable to Snap because they’re valuable to advertisers. They also interact with the app the most: Users 24 and younger visit it more than 20 times a day and spend at least 30 minutes there, while those 25 and older log 12 visits lasting a total of 20 minutes, according to Snap.