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1293 posts
  • Higher Education
  • California State University
  • University of California
  • Community Colleges
Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White listens to a speaker at the Cal State Board of Trustees meeting in March.
Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White listens to a speaker at the Cal State Board of Trustees meeting in March. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White, who flew to Washington, D.C., this week to speak out against President Trump's decision to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program,  said he was "cautiously optimistic" that Congress will find a way to preserve the program that protects nearly 800,000 young immigrants.

In back-to-back meetings with Republicans and Democrats, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco), Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) and U.S. Department of Education undersecretary James Manning, the chancellor made his case for the more than 8,000 students without legal status at Cal State, the nation’s largest public university system.

“Folks were empathetic and impressed with how many of our students are involved in the DACA program, how important it is, and how the uncertainty around the possibility of the program going away is debilitating to our students,” White said in an interview Wednesday. “I think there's a will to get something done. There are some who think it might get done in the next handful of weeks and others who think it might take another calendar year. Politics is politics, but I'm cautiously optimistic that there's a permanent, workable legislative solution that's in the mix now."

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(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Unified School Board President Ref Rodriguez was charged Wednesday with three felony counts of conspiracy, perjury and procuring and offering a false or forged instrument, among other charges, the result of a months-long investigation by local authorities into donations to his successful first-time run for office in 2015.

The charges against Rodriguez, 46, who represents District 5, which stretches from Los Feliz to South Gate, were detailed in a news release from the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office.

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(Roger Wilson / Burbank Leader)

Some local high school students are challenging Burbank Unified’s dress code, saying it is sexist against girls, and they are planning to survey parents, teachers and students on how to amend the policy.

Eight students from Burroughs and Burbank high schools shared their personal experiences dealing with the dress code during the public-comment period of a Burbank school board meeting last week.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

Rafe Esquith may have been America’s most famous teacher — even, some said, its best — when the Los Angeles Unified School District fired him in 2015.

Three lawsuits prompted by that dismissal were put aside as the two sides settled and issued a brief joint statement Wednesday morning. 

Esquith, 63, will receive lifetime health benefits, earned by his long tenure as a teacher, and the satisfaction that the settlement includes language intended to better protect the rights of teachers accused of wrongdoing. His attorneys describe the settlement as a major win for all L.A. teachers. 

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
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L.A. schools Supt. Michelle King, left, with school board member Monica Garcia
L.A. schools Supt. Michelle King, left, with school board member Monica Garcia (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

University of California regents, meeting this week in San Diego, will take a look at campus policies for rescinding admission offers, prompted by the debacle that came after UC Irvine abruptly canceled nearly 500 acceptances this summer.

The regents, meeting Wednesday and Thursday, also will discuss the preliminary budget for next year, including the impact of another potential tuition increase.

(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

How should California define underperforming schools and intervene in school districts that clearly need extra help?

Education officials have long been mulling these questions, but during the State Board of Education meeting on Wednesday and Thursday, they are expected to make key decisions and offer one last chance for public discussion of how the state will satisfy a crucial federal law.

Here are three key issues we’ll be following, and we hope you’ll join us. You can watch the meeting here.

(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

When the state of California asked the Obama administration for permission to drop an old science test in favor of a new one that the state was putting into place, the answer — more than once — was no.

The test waiver issue, technical as it may seem, is one example of how California, despite fighting the Trump administration on many fronts, is benefiting in certain ways from the change in regime.

The Trump administration is big on cutting regulations and red tape.

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  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
Celerity Dyad Charter School
Celerity Dyad Charter School (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Under scrutiny from federal and L.A. Unified investigators, a group of Los Angeles charter schools is splitting from its parent organization and one of its longtime leaders.

At a meeting of the Los Angeles Unified school board on Tuesday, Celerity Educational Group CEO Grace Canada announced that she is stepping down. According to the group's lawyer, Celerity has also ended its contracts with Celerity Global Development and will no longer be paying management fees to the organization.

“I just want to convey the big picture here — it is a new day at Celerity,” Canada said. She did not say when she planned to leave the organization.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD

The Los Angeles Unified School District appears to have once again broken its all-time record, reporting a preliminary graduation rate of 80.2% for the class of 2017.

That’s up 3 percentage points from the year before, part of a rapid uphill climb. From 2015 to 2016, the graduate rate rose 5 percentage points, from 72% to 77%.

Supt. Michelle King told board members that the rate had “topped 80%” at Tuesday’s board meeting. District officials confirmed the number via email.