Advertisement
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
A student walkout at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts on Thursday.
A student walkout at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts on Thursday. (Molly Kleinman)

Students at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts walked out of classes today after one teenager accused another of rape. 

Some students and parents are concerned that they were not told anything about what allegedly happened. Some also were upset over what they saw as inaction on the part of the school district.  

The campus, on the north edge of downtown L.A., is the flagship arts high school for the Los Angeles Unified School District. 

A 15-year-old student killed two classmates and hit a dozen others with gunfire Tuesday, methodically firing a handgun inside a crowded atrium at his rural Kentucky high school, authorities said.

"He was determined. He knew what he was doing," said Alexandria Caporali, who grabbed her stunned friend and ran into a classroom as their classmates hit the floor.

Advertisement

A tentative three-year agreement between the Los Angeles Unified School District and eight unions is good for the district's 60,000 employees, at least in the short term. They hold onto the healthcare choices they have now without having to contribute to their costs.

"After years of district threats to our healthcare, it is a victory to have all unions remain steadfast against any concessions," the unions said in a joint statement.

Malala Yousafzai
Malala Yousafzai (Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

In and around Los Angeles:

L.A. Unified’s tentative deal on healthcare is good for employees, but it does little to alleviate the district’s ongoing financial woes.

A video of a Carthay Center Elementary School teacher stripping naked on campus has parents up in arms.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
Schools across California are using new science standards that emphasize hands-on learning.
Schools across California are using new science standards that emphasize hands-on learning. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

L.A. Unified and its labor unions have reached a tentative deal on healthcare.

Ben Austin, an L.A.-based education activist, is creating a new school accountability campaign focused on LAUSD.

Advertisement

The University of California is proposing to raise tuition and the student services fee for state residents by 2.7%, an increase of $342 to a total of $12,972 for the 2018-19 academic year.

The budget proposal, which UC regents are set to consider Wednesday, would mark the second consecutive tuition increase after a freeze of several years. Nonresident students would pay an additional $978 in supplemental tuition, bringing their total to $28,992.

UCLA fraternities no longer can host parties with alcohol at their houses, the university's student-led Interfraternity Council announced Wednesday.

A collection of fraternity leaders "self-proposed an indefinite ban on events involving alcohol that take place within IFC chapter facilities," and approved it unanimously Tuesday, according to a statement from UCLA's Interfraternity Council Executive Board.

California is headed toward another standoff with the federal government — this time, over education.

The U.S. Department of Education, led by Betsy DeVos, had told the state that its plan to satisfy a major education law had significant flaws. On Thursday, the California State Board of Education voted to send a revised version of that plan, still missing an important component, back to Washington.

Advertisement
  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
UCLA has new rules for fraternity parties.
UCLA has new rules for fraternity parties. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

Melanie Lundquist, a philanthropist from Palos Verdes Estates, stood in the hall near the principal's office at Santee Education Complex near downtown Los Angeles.

Jaden Pitts, a 17-year-old senior from South L.A., happened to be walking by. He is a Lundquist fellow, which means he's no slouch. The young man has served as student body treasurer, was a member of the committee that chose the current Santee principal, plays guard on the basketball team, runs sprints on his track team, and started a campus club — Brothers and Hermanos — to explore why male students lag behind females in school performance.

Every year, the California Department of Education and many of its school districts boast about record-high graduation rates.

But a federal audit raises questions about the accuracy of the local and statewide numbers.

Advertisement