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  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
(Getty Images)

President Trump on Monday signed a handful of measures rolling back Obama-era regulations.

The measures sent to the president's desk under the Congressional Review Act are part of a larger GOP effort to eliminate an array of regulations issued during President Obama's final months in office and come days after Trump's effort to repeal and replace "Obamacare" failed. Trump has made overturning what he deems government over-reach a centerpiece of his first months in office.

"I will keep working with Congress, with every agency, and most importantly, the American people, until we eliminate every unnecessary, harmful and job-killing regulation that we can find," Trump said at a White House signing ceremony. "We have a lot more coming."

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  • K-12
(K.C. Alfred / San Diego Union-Tribune)

Facing a backlog that has pushed even routine public-records requests to three months or longer, the San Diego Unified School District will begin posting documents on the Internet as they are released.

In a memo to district managers last week, district lawyers said the change is part of an effort to reduce response times and increase transparency.

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(Alex Wong / Getty Images)

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  • K-12
  • University of California
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UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks
UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks (Karl Mondon / Bay Area News Group)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

A security breach was not enough to derail Granada Hills Charter High School, a perennial favorite, from winning this year’s California Academic Decathlon in Sacramento in results announced Sunday.

The problem ended up invalidating the Super Quiz, which is the highest-profile and only public portion of the annual competition. In the quiz, teams of students submit answers to questions that are tallied in real time before enthusiastic onlookers.

  • K-12
(JIJI PRESS / AFP/Getty Images)

Eight Japanese high school students were presumed dead after being caught in an avalanche Monday while being trained in mountain climbing at a ski resort, authorities and media said.

The avalanche occurred in the town of Nasu in Tochigi prefecture, about 120 miles north of Tokyo. Forty other people were injured, including two who were in serious condition, the prefecture said.

  • Higher Education

In a lively panel Friday at Pitzer College, education leaders and experts on race, immigration and civil rights gathered before dozens of students and professors to discuss the future of liberal arts education in today's political climate. 

"We do have an obligation to create a safe space here, but we will have differences in opinion. We have donors who have threatened to withdraw their resources because we are 'breaking the law' — which we are not," said Melvin Oliver, Pitzer's new president, who in November became one of the first to declare a college as sanctuary. 

"So this is the situation that we find ourselves in... we are going to have to take grave stances that may cost us."
 

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UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks improperly accepted free university benefits, including membership to the campus fitness center, two years of personal training sessions and the unauthorized transfer of exercise equipment from the public gym to his private residence, a university investigation has found.

Overall, Dirks failed to pay for $4,990 in fees for the gym membership and personal training and enjoyed the private use of a Precor Cross Trainer elliptical exercise machine worth between $3,500 and $4,000, according to findings of the heavily redacted report released Friday.

UC ethics rules bar employees from the unauthorized use of campus resources or facilities or the “entanglement” of private interests with UC obligations. The investigation, performed for the UC Office of the President by an outside firm, Public Interest Investigations Inc., concluded that Dirks violated those rules and concluded that the allegations against him by an unnamed whistleblower were founded.

Wounded students from the American University of Afghanistan receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul.
Wounded students from the American University of Afghanistan receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul. (Wakil Kohsar / AFP/Getty Images)

Seven months after an insurgent attack shattered their oasis in one of the world’s most turbulent capitals, students are expected to return to classes Saturday at a more heavily secured American University of Afghanistan.

While the main campus that was attacked won’t reopen until summer, a smaller compound less than a mile away plans to welcome students with concrete T-walls for blast protection, bulletproof gates and steel safe doors, along with fresh desks, white boards and carpets.