The basics

What it would do: amend the state Constitution to define marriage as only between a man and a woman.
Main arguments in favor: Eight years ago, California voters passed Proposition 22, which defined marriage as between a man and a woman, by more than 60%. Proponents say the will of the people was overturned by the California Supreme Court, which allowed same-sex marriage earlier this year. This undermines the value of marriage, backers say.
Main arguments against: Foes argue that people should not be treated differently under the law because of their sexual orientation. Gays and lesbians should keep the right to marry like everyone else, say opponents.

The money

Major donors to the "yes" side: Knights of Columbus, Focus on the Family, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Major donors to the "no" side: Pacific Gas & Electric; Robert Haas, chairman emeritus of Levi Strauss & Co.; director Steven Spielberg; Service Employees International Union's California State Council; California Teachers Assn.
--Proposition 8 proponents and foes raise $60 million
--Database: The Times' interactive map on Prop. 8 donations.

The issues

--How California came to lead the nation in gay rights
--Gay married couples face legal limbo if Prop. 8 passes
--Prop. 8 still trailing, but gap is narrowing, poll says
--In the fight over Prop. 8, confusion reigns
--Black clergy both for and against gay marriage speak out

The people


--Prayer in the service of politics: Young members of a communal home are praying and fasting

--Hollywood in slow-mo on Proposition 8
--Video: Gay marriages begin in California
--Database: The Times' interactive map on where marriages spiked.

The commentary

--Times editorial: No on Prop. 8
--Protecting marriage to protect children
--Prop 8 ads' invisible gays
--Gay marriage and the black vote
--Prop. 8 and teaching to the gay marriage test