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LAPD officer pleads not guilty in prescription drug sales case

CrimeLos Angeles Police Department
An LAPD officer pleads not guilty to charges of offering to sell hydrocodone online to undercover detective

A Los Angeles police officer pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges he offered to sell prescription drugs to an undercover detective.

Randolph Agard, 40, was charged Friday with one count of sale or transportation for sale of a controlled substance and one count of possession for sale of a controlled substance, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office.

In April, LAPD narcotics officers conducted an undercover operation and placed an ad seeking drugs on a classified website. Agard allegedly responded the same day and agreed to meet. 

On April 23, Agard arrived at the meeting place and was arrested by narcotics officers. He allegedly was carrying 20 hydrocodone pills in his jacket pocket, according to the district attorney's office.

Agard faces up to five years in state prison if convicted. He returns to court July 17 to arrange a date for a preliminary hearing. He was released on his own recognizance. 

For breaking news in Los Angeles and the Southland, follow @Caitlin__Owens, or email her at caitlin.owens@latimes.com.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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