Hangin' there, baby?

Lifestyle and LeisureCookingDining and DrinkingBrunchHealthMaxwell StreetSt. Patrick's Day

The parades may have already gone by, but if you're a die-hard St. Patrick's Day fan, you'll be at it again on Friday--and it's gonna hurt the next morning. The luck of the Irish is with you, though, because we've picked the best dishes in town to help you nurse that hangover.

Maxwell Street Omelet
If greasy meats and breakfast make up your hangover cure, Maxwell Street brunch pioneer Hashbrowns will hook you up with their locally named omelet, a concoction filled with chunks of pork, polish sausage and loads of grilled onions, served with a side of sweet potato hashbrowns ($7.95). Several other neighborhood-themed omelets, pancakes, five types of hashbrowns, and a small lunch menu of sandwiches and salads round out the offerings in this trendy, industrial space.

Traditional Irish breakfast
To keep the party going right on through the next day, start your morning with a brunch buffet at Mystic Celt , complete with corned beef and cabbage for $9.95, or opt for their traditional Irish breakfast including spicy Irish sausage, Irish bacon, black and white puddings, grilled tomatoes, Irish baked beans and breakfast potatoes ($9.50). In either case, don't forget to order your pint of Guinness; it wouldn't be an Irish breakfast without it!

Chicken fried steak
Sometimes the best place to nurse a hangover is at a diner, and FlyingSaucer has the cure in their chicken fried steak. Here, Heartland Farms organic sirloin gets deep-fried and served with sausage gravy, two eggs, cheese grits and a biscuit ($10.95). If that doesn't do the trick, you can always wolf down a plate of the spot's pierogis ($5.75). The Saucer, originally a '40s-era Polish diner, has been fully restored with original touches like counter service so you can comfortably recover alone--and never have to worry about your coffee getting cold.

Patties for Patty's
If your day-after doesn't start until lunchtime, head to Dine for the duo of burgers. One is kobe beef; the other is wild boar, and both areserved with blue cheese and fries ($15). Add a side of corned beef hash to make it a more festive feast ($4). If the hair of the dog is your hangover prescription, sidle up to the eatery's large and inviting martini bar for the seasonal Chicago River martini with Q gin, Grey Goose vodka and green Chartreuse ($7).

Corned beef and cabbage
If you chose to party in the center of the action and find yourself waking up on a street with numbers higher than you can count, you know you're in South Side Irish country. In that case, head straight to Gilhooley's Grande Saloonwhere they know how to treat you rightwith slow-cooked corned beef, green cabbage, fresh carrots and steamed red potatoes ($11.95). Sunday earlybirds can order a morning brunch buffet complete with Guinness-braised beef, corned beef hash and Irish soda bread ($10.95).

Rachel Klein is a metromix special contributor.

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