Overweight, tattooed, stoned? The Pentagon may still want you

The Pentagon in Washington. (AFP/Getty Images)

The new U.S. military wants you -- even if you're overweight, covered in tats and stoned on weed.

The Pentagon is considering that recruiting pitch as it scrambles to keep up with America's changing social mores and strives to attract the tech-savvy talent it needs to fight future wars.

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Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

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Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced a broad review of recruiting standards this week, saying he wants to ensure that rules are not “unnecessarily restrictive” on issues like fitness, tattoos, marijuana use and letting single parents enlist.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

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“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

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“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

“Some of the fitness standards can be addressed in remedial fashion after recruiting,” said Michael E. O'Hanlon, a military analyst at the nonpartisan Brookings Institution in Washington.

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