This semester tuition will cost students $12,000 at some top Washington universities. But soon, that will seem like nothing as prices are expected to rise by $8,000 in the next seven years, according to an actuarial estimate conducted by the state government.

The tuition projections were made for the purpose of pricing Washington's prepaid college GET program, which allows parents to pay for college well in advance, said Margaret Shepherd, the University of Washington's Director of State Relations.

Shepherd called the rising tuition costs "pretty breathtaking." Some students may have to take out additional loans or find other means to pay for school.

"It's outrageous,” said Victoria Felgar, a student at the University of Washington Tacoma. “Right now I’m working two jobs just to afford school and books and it's just a struggle with maintaining responsibility with studies and going to school and working two jobs."

State funding for higher education in Washington was cut by 50 percent during the economic recession. Double digit tuition increases have been necessary to make sure schools can make up for that loss in state funding.

“The real difference is in who pays,” Shepherd explained. “Twenty years ago when lots of folks were in college, the state was paying 80 percent of the cost of an education and students were paying 20 percent. We've flipped that now, 20 years later students are paying 70 percent of the cost of an education, that state is paying 30."