Worst: Loyalty trumps common sense

In October I posted a <a href="http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-bad-politicians-20121003,0,5394746.story">photo essay</a> listing seven politicians who had amply demonstrated their unsuitability for elected office but who had a strong chance of keeping their seats anyway. Four of the seven were, in fact, reelected, proving that voters in their districts either weren't paying attention or were so loyal to the incumbent that no amount of scandal, incompetence or even incapacity could sway them. <br><br>

The less-than-fabulous four: Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel of New York, who was censured by Congress in 2010 after a variety of ethical lapses; California state Sen. Roderick Wright (D-Inglewood), who is facing charges of voter fraud and perjury; Michigan House Speaker Jase Bolger, a Republican who was involved in an elaborate scheme to defraud voters; and Democratic Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., who didn't campaign for his seat because he was being treated for bipolar disorder and who resigned from Congress shortly after being reelected.
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Above: Rangel is seen at a news conference in 2010.

( Bebeto Matthews / Associated Press )

In October I posted a photo essay listing seven politicians who had amply demonstrated their unsuitability for elected office but who had a strong chance of keeping their seats anyway. Four of the seven were, in fact, reelected, proving that voters in their districts either weren't paying attention or were so loyal to the incumbent that no amount of scandal, incompetence or even incapacity could sway them.

The less-than-fabulous four: Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel of New York, who was censured by Congress in 2010 after a variety of ethical lapses; California state Sen. Roderick Wright (D-Inglewood), who is facing charges of voter fraud and perjury; Michigan House Speaker Jase Bolger, a Republican who was involved in an elaborate scheme to defraud voters; and Democratic Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., who didn't campaign for his seat because he was being treated for bipolar disorder and who resigned from Congress shortly after being reelected.

Above: Rangel is seen at a news conference in 2010.

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