"Despite this so-called 'ban', which was reviewed and approved by University President Graham Spanier without any further inquiry on his part, there was no effective change in Sandusky's status with the school and no limits on his access to the campus," Kelly said. "Sandusky's 'emeritus' position, alleged negotiated as part of his 1999 retirement, provided him with an office in the Lasch Football Building; unlimited access to all football facilities, including the locker room; access to all recreational facilities; a parking pass; a university Internet account; listing in the faculty directory and numerous other privileges – he had remained a regular presence on campus."

During testimony before the grand jury, Schultz acknowledged that he was aware of a 1998 University Police investigation that also involved allegations of sexually inappropriate behavior involving Sandusky and young boys in the football showers, but did not pursue the matter further and did not seek any additional review in light of the new report in 2002.

The grand jury also noted that the 1998 report involving Sandusky and boys in the showers was reviewed by University Police and Child Protective Services, with the blessing of Wendell Courtney, who at the time served as University Counsel and was (and remains) counsel to The Second Mile – though no criminal charges were ever pursued.

Kelly said the grand jury determined that Curley and Schultz had provided false testimony while discussing their response to the 2002 report of a child sexual assault in the football showers.

Specifically, the grand jury found that Curley committed perjury in repeatedly denying that he had ever been told that Sandusky had engaged in sexual misconduct with a child.

Additionally, assertions by Schultz that the allegations concerning Sandusky were "not that serious" and that he and Curley "had no indication that a crime had occurred" were in direct contradiction to other testimony and constituted perjury. The grand jury found that portions of the testimony provided by both Curley and Schultz were not credible. "The failure of top university officials to act on reports of Sandusky's alleged sexual misconduct, even after it was reported to them in graphic detail by an eyewitness, allowed a predator to walk free for years - continuing to target new victims," Kelly said. "Equally disturbing is the lack of action and apparent lack of concern among those same officials, and others who received information about this case, who either avoided asking difficult questions or chose to look the other way."

Kelly said that despite the false testimony and "uncooperative atmosphere" encompassing some Penn State University and Second Mile officials, investigators from the Attorney General's Office and State Police gradually uncovered a pattern of other potential sexual assaults by Sandusky. The grand jury eventually identified a total of eight young men who were the targets of similar sexual advances or assaults by Sandusky, starting in 1994 and continuing through 2009. All of the victims first encountered Sandusky through Second Mile activities.

Kelly and Noonan explained that the search continues for additional victims and this case remains an active and ongoing investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact investigators from the Office of Attorney General at 814-863-1053 or Pennsylvania State Police at 814-470-2238.

  • Sandusky is charged with the following offenses:
  • Seven counts of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, all first-degree felonies which are each punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.
  • One count of aggravated indecent assault, a second-degree felony punishable by up to ten years in prison and a $25,000 fine.
  • Four counts of unlawful contact with a minor, all first-degree felonies which are each punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.
  • Four counts of unlawful contact with a minor, all third-degree felonies which are each punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine.
  • Four counts of endangering the welfare of a child, all third-degree felonies which are each punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine.
  • Four counts of endangering the welfare of a child, all first-degree misdemeanors which are each punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine
  • Eight counts of corruption of minors, all first-degree misdemeanors which are each punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
  • One count of indecent assault, a third-degree felony punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine.
  • Four counts of indecent assault, all second-degree misdemeanors which are each punishable by up to two years in prison and a $5,000 fine.
  • Two counts of indecent assault, all first-degree misdemeanors which are each punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
  • One count of attempt to commit indecent assault, a second-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to two years in prison and a $5,000 fine.


Sandusky was taken into custody today in Centre County and is scheduled to be preliminarily arraigned before State College Magisterial District Judge Leslie A. Dutchcot.

Curley and Schultz are each charged with one count of perjury, a third-degree felony punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine, along with one count each of failure to report (under the Child Protective Services Law), a summary offense punishable by up to 90 days in prison and a $200 fine.

Curley and Schultz are scheduled to surrender on Monday, November 7th, before Harrisburg Magisterial District Judge Marsha Stewart.

Sandusky will be prosecuted in Centre County, while Curley and Schultz will be prosecuted in Dauphin County, all by Senior Deputy Attorney General Jonelle Harter Eshbach of the Attorney General's Criminal Prosecutions Section.

Kelly thanked the Pennsylvania State Police for their extensive assistance with this joint investigation.