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President Trump canceled his November military parade in Washington before leaving town for the weekend.
President Trump canceled his November military parade in Washington before leaving town for the weekend. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

President Trump tweeted a few hours ago that he was canceling the national military parade he had ordered up for this fall in Washington, a decision he made just as unilaterally as when he told the Pentagon to make the arrangements in the first place.

The idea was to march soldiers, veterans and military vehicles (not tanks or other tracked vehicles that would churn up city streets) down a stretch of  Pennsylvania Avenue — which presumably would have passed in front of the Trump International Hotel along the way. Not that the parade would have drawn business for the Trump family enterprise or anything.

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  • Opinion
Aretha Franklin sings during a memorial service in Detroit, Mich. on June 7, 2015.
Aretha Franklin sings during a memorial service in Detroit, Mich. on June 7, 2015. (Elizabeth Conley / The Detroit News via AP)

Aretha died Thursday morning at the age of 76. We don’t need to say Franklin. She was singular. And anyhow, you already know.

In a statement, Quincy Jones wrote, “Aretha Franklin set the bar upon which every female singer has and will be measured.” Simple as that. She took songs you thought you’d loved (“The Weight,” for instance, or “Bridge Over Troubled Water”) and infused them with new energy. She was a diamond Midas.

At age 10, I learned about Aretha after a much cooler kid told me she’d sung “Say a Little Prayer for You,” a campy, all-cast version of which was featured in my favorite rom-com, “My Best Friend’s Wedding.” I tracked her version down in a tiny town in New England and sang my little guts out to it. She found us all, eventually. Many of us remember exactly when.

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  • Opinion
  • The Golden State
Elon Musk's tunneling company is proposing a 3.6-mile tunnel to Dodger Stadium.
Elon Musk's tunneling company is proposing a 3.6-mile tunnel to Dodger Stadium. (Chris Saucedo / Getty Images)

Traffic in Los Angeles is infamously awful. Congestion on freeways and streets makes it hard for drivers and bus riders to get across the city for work, school and socializing.

Thank goodness the rich entrepreneurs of the world are on the case, coming up with solutions to solve the most pressing transportation problems in L.A.

Like cutting travel times for Dodger Stadium.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Former Times cartoonist Paul Conrad's depiction of Nixon enmeshed by the Watergate scandal; Conrad was on Nixon's enemies list.
Former Times cartoonist Paul Conrad's depiction of Nixon enmeshed by the Watergate scandal; Conrad was on Nixon's enemies list. (Paul Conrad/LA Times)

President Trump announced Wednesday that in addition to stripping former CIA director John Brennan of his security clearance, he’s reviewing the clearances of nine other former top government officials who have – in some cases harshly – criticized the president. Yes, the president has an enemies list.

How Nixonian of him.

President Trump speaks at a July news conference at the White House.
President Trump speaks at a July news conference at the White House. (Shawn Thew / EPA/Shutterstock)

More than 300 newspapers around the country will participate today in a group protest of President Trump’s frequent attacks on the news media. Each of the papers will publish editorials — their own separate editorials, in their own words — defending freedom of the press.

The Los Angeles Times, however, has decided not to participate. There will be no free press editorial on our page today.

This is not because we don’t believe that President Trump has been engaged in a cynical, demagogic and unfair assault on our industry. He has, and we have written about it on numerous occasions. As early as April 2017, we wrote this as part of a full-page editorial on “Trump’s War on Journalism”:

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  • Opinion
Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who is running to become Minnesota's attorney general, speaks to supporters in Minneapolis on Tuesday.
Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who is running to become Minnesota's attorney general, speaks to supporters in Minneapolis on Tuesday. (Renee Jones Schneider / Associated Press)

On Tuesday evening, Rep. Keith Ellison won the Democratic Party nomination for Minnesota attorney general by more than 30 points. It should have been a wholly victorious moment for Ellison, a leader of the Democratic National Committee and a high-profile voice for its progressive flank.

It wasn’t. On Saturday night, Ellison’s former girlfriend’s son published a post on Facebook that accused Ellison of being violent toward his mother, Karen Monahan, during the course of their relationship. He claimed to have discovered abusive texts and tweets, as well as a two-minute video of Ellison dragging her by her feet while yelling expletives at her. Monahan later wrote that her son’s allegations were “true.” Ellison has denied the allegations, including at his victory party.

As a feminist and a survivor of sexual violence, I’m as inclined as one can be to believe women. And yet, my knee-jerk instinct was denial; the account didn’t match my own perception. I’ve followed Ellison’s career for years and interviewed him just last summer. In my experience, he presents himself as a kind and gentle person.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies last year before the House Intelligence Committee on the Russia investigation.
Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies last year before the House Intelligence Committee on the Russia investigation. (Melina Mara / Washington Post)

It’s hard to think of anything that could chill speech more powerfully than the message President Trump sent Wednesday.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders delivered that message at the afternoon briefing, announcing that Trump had revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. His main offense? Being a harsh critic of the Trump administration.

Let’s be clear about a couple things right up front. The president absolutely has the authority to yank security clearances. They’re supposed to lapse (technically, move from “active” to “current”) as soon as the holder leaves a job that requires such clearance, but Sanders said presidents have traditionally left them in place for former top intelligence and law enforcement officials so they could advise their successors “and as a professional courtesy.”

  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
Children fight 109-degree heat in Rosemead last month. Scientists warn that the next five years could see more of the same.
Children fight 109-degree heat in Rosemead last month. Scientists warn that the next five years could see more of the same. (Los Angeles Times)

Southern California sweated out record-setting triple-digit temperatures in July in places ranging from downtown Los Angeles to Santa Ana. That’s Inland Empire heat in the L.A. Basin.

And 2018 is on track to be one of the hottest years since record-keeping began in 1880, fitting in with the past four years – 2016 was the warmest year, 2015 the second-warmest, followed by 2017 and 2014.  And 2016 was an El Niño year, as this year might prove to be (70% chance by winter) —  El Niños put upward pressure on temperatures.

And now scientists are using a new probability formula say the next five years will likely be “anomalously warm.”

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  • Opinion
  • The Golden State
  • Election 2018
The state Capitol in Sacramento
The state Capitol in Sacramento (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Vanessa Delgado must be having some seriously mixed emotions about joining the California Senate this week: Joy at winning a special election last week to replace former state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), who quit earlier this year rather than face an expulsion vote by his peers, and despair that her first month in the Senate will effectively be her last.

This odd proposition is due to the peculiarities of California’s election law, which requires a special election for vacant seats even if there’s a concurrent election for the next regular term. It’s silly, costly and, as we now see, unfair to the candidates in both races. (The editorial board has written more than once that the special election rules ought to be revised.)

Delgado ran in both races. She was one of the two top vote-getters in the special election primary (then won the runoff in that race), but did not make the November runoff for the next four-year term.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
"Unhinged," the new tell-all book by former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, at a Washington, D.C., bookstore Tuesday.
"Unhinged," the new tell-all book by former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, at a Washington, D.C., bookstore Tuesday. (Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images)

Tuesday morning, President Trump tweeted (kill me) that his former communications aide Omarosa Manigault Newman (seriously, let’s get off this planet) is a “dog.”

It was just the latest in a string of insults he’s lobbed at high-profile black Americans. Less than two weeks ago, he called basketball star LeBron James and CNN anchor Don Lemon dumb. (This is a Trump go-to: he’s repeatedly said Rep. Maxine Waters has a “low I.Q.”)

Trump is riled up that Newman has been on the talk-show circuit promoting her new book, a splashy tell-all about her time in the White House. On “CBS This Morning,” she unveiled a tape from the campaign that appears to reveal aides discussing how to handle Trump’s alleged use of the N-word if it ever came to light.