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Cyclists & Drivers: Sharing the road in L.A.

Los Angeles, a city once in love with the internal combustion engine, has begun a romance with the bicycle. Can it last? Should it?

From September 2013 through February 2014, the Los Angeles Times editorial board engaged readers in a conversation about changing attitudes toward the region’s roadways and the people who share them, especially motorists and cyclists. RoadshareLA looks at lessons learned from the discussion and attempts to shape an agenda for divvying up the asphalt.

Follow the conversation on Twitter: #roadshareLA

 

 

  • L.A.'s cyclists should need a special 'info' license in order to ride

    L.A.'s cyclists should need a special 'info' license in order to ride

    In June 2009, just as L.A.’s bicycling resurgence was beginning, the city of Los Angeles repealed its law requiring cyclists get licenses. Bad move. Before you go hollering bloody murder about "big gubmint" (and me), read on. With the throngs of two-wheeled commuters, green believers and just-for-fun...

  • Hit-and-run heatmap highlights danger to cyclists, and perhaps callousness of drivers

    Hit-and-run heatmap highlights danger to cyclists, and perhaps callousness of drivers

    “Are cyclists and drivers sharing the road,” the Times editorial page asked a year ago, “or are they locked in a struggle for street hegemony?” It was a question the page explored through the Roadshare project, and of course there are many ways to answer it. One answer, though, came over Thanksgiving...

  • Hit a cyclist, help a cyclist? These readers aren't so sure

    Hit a cyclist, help a cyclist? These readers aren't so sure

    On the way into work this morning, I spotted (along with, no doubt, several indignant drivers nearby) a cyclist traveling down the wrong way of a street to bypass the traffic choking the two downtown L.A.-bound lanes of Glendale Boulevard. I also noticed countless cars roll through stop signs,...

  • Drivers, start your eyeballs, the three-foot rule for cyclists is here

    Drivers, start your eyeballs, the three-foot rule for cyclists is here

    A California law requiring drivers to maintain a distance of three feet when passing cyclists on the road goes into effect next week. The Three Feet for Safety Act, passed last year by the Legislature, is the latest sign of an important cultural shift in a state famously dominated by automobiles....

  • Some bumps in the road on the way to a bike-friendly L.A.

    Some bumps in the road on the way to a bike-friendly L.A.

    As the city of Los Angeles continues its ambitious 35-year project to build out 1,684 miles of bikeways, it is running into resistance in some neighborhoods from politicians, merchants and residents. Plans to paint bike lanes on a three-mile stretch of North Figueroa from York Boulevard to Avenue...

  • During Bike Week, a reminder that cyclists have a long way to go

    During Bike Week, a reminder that cyclists have a long way to go

    Anyone who pedals her bike on the road rightly expects to enjoy the full protection of the law. Tragically, the San Francisco district attorney’s decision this week not to press charges against a driver who was obviously — as in, there’s video evidence — at fault in a collision that killed a cyclist...

  • Can car-happy L.A. learn to share the road?

    Can car-happy L.A. learn to share the road?

    Re-imagining the city's streets to accommodate bikes and cars: It's the law, but how will it work?

  • What Long Beach can teach us about cycling, and politics

    What Long Beach can teach us about cycling, and politics

    “This is a BFD,” exclaims Charlie Gandy on a Long Beach street corner, but it’s not what you think. “BFD” is Gandy’s playful shorthand for a bike-friendly business district, and Gandy is giving me his tour, one he has given dozens of times, of the bike-friendly Long Beach that he helped create —...

  • New York has bike sharing. So does Chicago. So why doesn't L.A.?

    New York has bike sharing. So does Chicago. So why doesn't L.A.?

    After fits and starts, it looks like Los Angeles County is getting closer to building a bike sharing system. New York, Chicago, Denver and San Francisco all have established bike share programs, in which bicycles can be rented for short trips and returned to docking stations throughout the city....

  • When it comes to bike paths, L.A. should look to Orange County

    When it comes to bike paths, L.A. should look to Orange County

    They have bicycles in Orange County too, you know. And, as it turns out, an aggressive and interesting program to expand the bike path system. Which makes me happy, since I live in Orange County — and even though I’m not a cyclist. It’s part of a pact I have with gravity: We don’t mess with each...

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