Ciampaglione nets McDaniel honor for career in education

EducationColleges and UniversitiesSchoolsElementary SchoolsHuman InterestEnergy SavingIndiana University of Pennsylvania

Christi Noll Ciampaglione has been named by McDaniel College as the recipient of its 2012 Joseph R. Bailer Award.

The award is presented each year to a McDaniel College master's degree recipient who has made a significant contribution to the field of education.

Christi Noll Ciampaglione graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1996. She earned a master's degree in human services management from McDaniel in 1999 and served as a Target Scholar completing a two-year live-in internship with Target Community & Educational Services, Inc. She started Target's first family support services program in Montgomery County, Md., which has served dozens of families of children with special needs.

In 2000, Ciampaglione became a vocational case manager for PSI Family Services in Washington, D.C., later becoming the director of the foster care program for children with disabilities.

For the past nine years, she has worked as a special education teacher for Prince William County, Va., Public Schools and is noted by her colleagues as an outstanding teacher of children with special needs. She is a strong collaborator with fellow teachers and resource specialists, and is highly respected by the parents of her students who seek her advice and guidance.

Additionally, she is the first graduate of the program to serve on the board of directors for Target Community & Educational Services, Inc.

The Joseph R. Bailer Award was established by the family of Dr. Bailer, who died in 1974. Bailer was chair of the Education Department at McDaniel College, then Western Maryland College and also Director of its graduate program from 1949-1971. He was a primary contributor to the growth of the program and influenced the lives of hundreds of graduate students,

Project Linus Blankets at Runnymede Elementary School

Students in grades K-5 at Runnymede Elementary School will be making blankets to donate to Project Linus, an organization that gives blankets to children who are sick or experiencing a traumatic life event.

Students and staff donated money to buy the material and supplies and will be making the blankets the week of December 17-21. Runnymede will end the week with an assembly to share how many blankets were made and for students to share their thoughts and experiences from the week. The goal is to make 150 blankets. Nicole Hunsicker, nehunsi@carrollk12.org

Green Club Meeting at Manchester Elementary School

Selected students in the third, fourth, and fifth grades at Manchester Elementary School will be participating in the school's Green Club. The Club will meet on Thursday, December 20, from 4 to 4:45 p.m.

The Green Club was organized to create and maintain an environmentally friendly school through the actions of the students, staff, and community members. The students will focus on maintaining the school grounds and garden and preventing erosion.

They will be energy savers by checking on staff in the building to make sure everyone is being energy conscious and that the school is recycling. Gina Roy, Teacher; Dodi Ritz, Instructional Assistant; Martin Tierney, Principal, Manchester Elementary School, 410-751-3410.

Alex's Lemonade Stand at Friendship Valley

On Friday, November 30, Friendship Valley Elementary School's third grade held a lemonade stand during lunch periods. The students decided to once again donate all of the proceeds to the Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

While planning the lemonade stand and on the actual day of sale, students were able to draw, make connections to, and utilize what they have been learning in humanities and math this school year.

The lemonade stand raised $815. According to the Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation, that would be enough money to fund two full days of research. For more details contact Matt Study, Teacher, Friendship Valley Elementary School, 410-751-3650.

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