Advertisement
184 posts
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats

Former President Barack Obama is returning to Los Angeles on June 28 to headline a fundraiser for the Democratic National Committee.

Tickets for the gala start at $2,700, which buys access to the former president’s speech as well as a performance by singer Christina Aguilera, according to the invitation.

To get fed, donors must pony up at least $15,000. The top ticket package, which includes five dinner tickets, premium seating, a picture, a reception, membership to the DNC finance committee and entry to two other events in 2018, goes for $100,000.

Advertisement
  • California Republicans
Ivanka Trump arrives for a news conference in the Rose Garden last week.
Ivanka Trump arrives for a news conference in the Rose Garden last week. (Richard Drew / Associated Press)

Ivanka Trump will travel to California next week to attend fundraisers with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, according to an invitation obtained by The Times and media reports

The two will headline events in Fresno and Los Angeles on Monday. Proceeds from the fundraisers will support Protect the House, a political action committee led by McCarthy and Vice President Mike Pence that is focused on protecting GOP control of Congress.

The eldest daughter of President Trump is not a regular on the fundraising circuit, but her visit is a sign of the priority that the administration places on the effort, particularly in California. The state is home to multiple congressional districts that are top targets for Democrats because they favored Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election but are represented in Congress by Republicans. 

Advertisement
  • State government
  • California Legislature
The governor has signed a new law aimed at improving the tracking of hate crimes by local law enforcement agencies.
The governor has signed a new law aimed at improving the tracking of hate crimes by local law enforcement agencies. (Associated Press)

After a state audit faulted law enforcement agencies including the Los Angeles Police Department for underreporting hate crimes, Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a measure that seeks to improve the investigation and tracking of incidents based on race, gender and sexual orientation, officials said Thursday.

The new law, which takes effect in January, sets minimum standards for how local law enforcement agencies investigate and report hate crimes, and addresses issues in a May 31 state audit that found hate crimes are underreported by 14% in California.

“We can’t stop the problem unless we know how big it is,” said Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), who introduced AB 1985. “My bill requires law enforcement to use the same language and follow the same reporting procedures so that we can get an accurate picture of the prevalence of hate crimes in California.

  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
Gavin Newsom, the Democratic candidate for governor, mixes with supporters at a rally Wednesday, saying he opposes breaking up the state.
Gavin Newsom, the Democratic candidate for governor, mixes with supporters at a rally Wednesday, saying he opposes breaking up the state. (Patrick McGreevy)

California’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom said Wednesday that he has been a friend of Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper for 20 years, but he is opposing a November ballot initiative championed by Draper to break California into three states.

“He is an incredibly bright and capable person,” Newsom told reporters at a campaign event in Sacramento. “That is not [exemplified] in this initiative, and I will not be supporting the initiative, and I don’t expect the people of this state will support it.”

Newsom, the lieutenant governor, faces Republican John Cox in the November election for governor.

  • 2018 election
Sen. leader Toni Atkins, left, state Democratic Party Chair Eric Bauman and Gov. Jerry Brown listen to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom speak at rally
Sen. leader Toni Atkins, left, state Democratic Party Chair Eric Bauman and Gov. Jerry Brown listen to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom speak at rally (Jonathan J. Cooper)

Rallying Democrats for the November election, Gov. Jerry Brown said Wednesday that he looks forward to passing the baton to Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, the party’s candidate for governor, who in turn promised to continue the progressive agenda pursued by Brown.

Standing in front of about four dozen activists and other Democratic candidates for state office, the 80-year-old governor said he would campaign for Newsom, saying the 50-year-old candidate would bring a “creative, energetic” approach to the governor’s office.

“Gavin Newsom will get stuff done. There is a time for an old guy, and there is time for a young guy,” Brown said, drawing laughter during the event at the state Democratic Party headquarters in Sacramento. “I was the right man at the right time, and right now Gavin Newsom is the right man at the right time for the next four years in California.”

Advertisement
  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
It would be the first division of an existing U.S. state since the creation of West Virginia in 1863.

California voters will have a historic decision to make in November’s election: whether they should live in three new states instead of one.

The proposal that qualified Tuesday for the fall ballot is far from the final step in the process, nor is its passage a guarantee that Northern California, Southern California and California would be newly drawn onto maps of the United States.

Here’s what would happen if voters approve the ballot measure by simple majority on Nov. 6.

  • California Legislature
  • Sexual harassment
California Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia, D-Bell Gardens, poses for picture at her campaign headquarters in Downey, Calif.
California Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia, D-Bell Gardens, poses for picture at her campaign headquarters in Downey, Calif. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

A groping allegation against Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia will get further legislative scrutiny, as lawmakers review the appeal of a complaint originally found to be unsubstantiated.

Daniel Fierro, a former legislative staffer who said Garcia (D-Bell Gardens) inappropriately touched him at a legislative softball game four years ago, filed a notice of appeal last month, after the initial months-long investigation did not substantiate his claim.

This week, an attorney for the Assembly notified Fierro’s lawyer by letter that the leaders of the Assembly Rules Committee, which oversees the investigation process, “both received and reviewed Mr. Fierro’s Notice of Appeal and instructed that further investigation be conducted with respect to Mr. Fierro’s allegations and the issues you identify in your Notice of Appeal.”

Larry Thomas, a San Diego native who parlayed a newspaper job writing about politics into a career as a press spokesman and strategist for a mayor, a governor, a vice president, and one of the largest real estate development companies in California, died Monday night at his home in Newport Beach from complications of cancer.

Advertisement

A bank has seized a Tulare County dairy farm owned by Rep. David Valadao and his family to resolve more than $8 million in loans that have not been repaid, according to court documents.

  • 2018 election
Assemblywoman Former Assembly Republican leader Kristin Olsen, shown when she was still in office, warned Monday of voter fatigue.
Assemblywoman Former Assembly Republican leader Kristin Olsen, shown when she was still in office, warned Monday of voter fatigue. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Californians are suffering from “voter fatigue,” so candidates who survived the June 5 primary will have to hone their message to better address specific issues and provide solutions for problems if they want to connect with the electorate in November, members of a panel of political experts said Monday.

Campaign workers found stacks of unread campaign mail on porches and in mailboxes and volunteers had trouble getting voters to open their doors and respond to canvassers, according to Bill Wong, a political consultant for Assembly Democrats.

“The voters are very disengaged. They weren’t answering phones,” Wong said during a forum on the election sponsored by California Target Book. “Clearly we are not connecting with voters and if we don’t do that in November we’re going to be in deep trouble.”