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Michael E. Capuano, a 10-term Democratic congressman from Boston, says he’s always delivered for the folks back home, but right now there’s an even higher priority: stopping Donald Trump.

“That’s why I voted twice to begin impeachment proceedings,” Capuano states in a reelection ad.

But Jacky Rosen, a freshman Democratic congresswoman from Las Vegas, says she’s waiting for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to complete his investigation of President Trump and his associates before supporting such a drastic step.

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Passerby gather in front of the Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Va., on Saturday.
Passerby gather in front of the Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Va., on Saturday. (Daniel Lin / Associated Press)

President Donald Trump on Monday trash-talked a Virginia restaurant that asked his press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, to leave because she worked for his administration.

Trump, in a Monday morning tweet, said that the Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Va., "should focus more on cleaning its filthy canopies, doors and windows (badly needs a paint job) rather than refusing to serve a fine person like Sarah Huckabee Sanders."

"I always had a rule, if a restaurant is dirty on the outside, it is dirty on the inside!" added Trump, an admitted germophobe, who has said he prefers eating at fast-food chains rather than independent eateries because he trusts them more.

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White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

People have been flooding a Red Hen restaurant with angry calls and negative reviews since White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was told to leave — but they've got the wrong Red Hen.

Restaurant managing partner Elizabeth Pope tells the Philadelphia Inquirer that the New Jersey eatery has received at least 600 phone calls from people mistaking it with a Virginia eatery with the same name.

The owner of the Red Hen in Lexington, Va., asked Sanders to leave the restaurant Friday, citing the concerns of employees.

  • Immigration
President Trump speaks in Las Vegas on Saturday.
President Trump speaks in Las Vegas on Saturday. (Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press)

President Trump says people who “invade” the U.S. must immediately be sent back to their countries and not be given a court hearing. 

Trump tweeted Saturday that the U.S. immigration system is “laughed at all over the world” and is “very unfair” to individuals using legal avenues to gain entry. 

“We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country,” Trump tweeted. “When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came. Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order.” 

  • Congress
  • Immigration

Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance) caused a stir on the House floor Friday when he played audio of sobbing children in a migrant detention center crying out for their parents.

He was quickly gaveled by the presiding officer, Rep. Karen Handel (R-Ga.), who told him to stop playing the audio because it was against House rules.

Lieu responded that Americans need to hear what was going on at the center.

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  • Immigration
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen (Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA / Shutterstock)

About two dozen people gathered Friday morning outside the Virginia home of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in response to the Trump administration's policy on separating children from their parents at the border.

According to an organizer of the protest, Nielsen was seen leaving through the back door of the home, in Alexandria, as the protest wound down around 8:30 a.m. It lasted about an hour.

Nielsen has become the face of President Trump's family separation policy, which he halted in an executive order Wednesday. At least 2,500 immigrant children have been separated from their families over the past six weeks at the border.

  • White House
  • Immigration
President Trump discusses immigration with members of Congress at the White House on Wednesday
President Trump discusses immigration with members of Congress at the White House on Wednesday (Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Shutterstock)

With an early morning tweet, President Trump put the likely final nail in the coffin of an immigration measure supported by the House GOP leadership, saying that lawmakers shouldn't bother with legislation he had claimed to support just days before.

"Republicans should stop wasting their time on Immigration until after we elect more Senators and Congressmen/women in November," Trump tweeted, forecasting that the GOP would gain seats in the midterm election.

Trump has shown consistent inconsistency on the proposal. Last Friday, he said during a television interview that he opposed it. Hours later, the White House reversed course, saying he supported it.

  • Supreme Court

In a billion-dollar victory for states, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday, 5-4, that states may impose sales taxes on internet businesses, even if they don't have physical locations in that state.

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A 2-year-old girl, with red sneakers and dark hair, crying as a U.S. Border Patrol agent searches her mother. Boys filing along white tents against a desolate desert backdrop. Toddlers screaming for their parents in a detention center in South Texas.

Several polls taken in recent weeks have found widespread public rejection of the Trump administration’s now-abandoned policy of separating children from parents when families are caught crossing the border illegally.

But at least one survey found that President Trump’s core supporters — those who voted for him during the GOP primaries in 2016 — were supportive of the idea. That suggests, as some of Trump’s advisors have said, that the policy was popular with his voters even as it was clearly political trouble for Republicans in some swing congressional districts. 

A poll by Quinnipiac University, taken June 14-17, found that the public opposed separating parents from children by 27%-66%. Republicans in that poll supported the policy 55%-35%, while Democrats opposed it 91%-7%.