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Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine) and his wife, Margaret, were indicted by a federal grand jury Tuesday on charges they used $250,000 in campaign funds for personal use and filed false campaign finance reports with the Federal Election Commission to mask their actions.

The 48-page indictment details lavish spending from 2009 to 2016, including family vacations to Italy and Hawaii, home utilities, school tuition for their children, video games and even dental work. The San Diego Union-Tribune first identified the improper spending, triggering a federal investigation by the Justice Department.

To conceal the personal expenditures, family dental bills were listed as a charitable contribution to “Smiles for Life,” the government alleges. Tickets for the family to see Riverdance at the San Diego Civic Theatre became “San Diego Civic Center for Republican Women Federated/Fundraising,” according to the indictment. Clothing purchases at a golf course were falsely reported as golf "balls for the wounded warriors." SeaWorld tickets worth more $250 were called an "educational tour.”

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It’s a very sad thing that happened. This has nothing to do with Russian collusion. ... It’s a witch hunt. It’s a disgrace. I feel very badly for Paul Manafort.

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Donald Trump's former personal lawyer and “fixer,” Michael Cohen, has pleaded guilty to charges including campaign finance fraud stemming from hush-money payments to porn actress Stormy Daniels and ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal. 

The 51-year-old Cohen said in federal court in New York on Tuesday that he made the payments in coordination with Trump, who wasn't named, to influence the election. Both women claimed Trump had affairs with them, which he denies. 

The other charges Cohen pleaded guilty to involve bank fraud and income tax evasion. 

Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.) at a hearing in July.
Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.) at a hearing in July. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.) is the vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He released this statement about the guilty verdict on eight counts in the trial of Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign manager:

“This verdict makes it absolutely clear that the Mueller probe is not a ‘witch hunt’ — it is a serious investigation that is rooting out corruption and Russian influence on our political system at the highest levels. The President’s campaign manager was just convicted of serious federal crimes by a jury of his peers, despite the President’s continued attempts to undermine the investigation which has brought Mr. Manafort to justice. Any attempt by the President to pardon Mr. Manafort or interfere in the investigation into his campaign would be a gross abuse of power and require immediate action by Congress.”

Paul Manafort.
Paul Manafort. (AFP-Getty Images)

Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign manager, was found guilty today on eight counts in the bank and tax fraud case against him. The jury remained undecided on the remaining 10 counts.

The verdicts come after prosecutors laid out what they said was Manafort’s scheme to illegally hide tens of millions of dollars he earned as a political consultant in Ukraine. They said he also committed fraud to obtain millions more in bank loans and mortgages. Manafort did not testify in his own defense.

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  • White House

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort asked the judge Tuesday what it should do if it cannot reach a consensus for a single count in the case. 

Jurors posed the question to U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III on their fourth day of deliberations, asking how they should fill in the verdict form if they are unable to agree on one of the charges. 

The jury in Alexandria, Va., is weighing 18 counts against Manafort, who is accused of hiding millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine and of lying on loan applications to maintain a lavish lifestyle. 

  • Environment
The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo., in July.
The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo., in July. (J. David Ake / Associated Press)

The Trump administration on Tuesday unveiled a sweeping rewrite of emissions rules for power plants in a boon to the coal industry, laying the groundwork for a revival of the most polluting facilities and abandoning Obama-era mandates for reorienting the electricity sector toward clean energy.

The Environmental Protection Agency called the regulations on coal power plants "overly prescriptive and burdensome."

The replacement for the federal Clean Power Plan reflects a dramatic about-face on national climate action. It is President Trump’s second major move in less than a month reflecting a retreat in the fight against global warming, following the administration’s plan to freeze fuel-economy standards for cars and trucks.

  • White House
  • Immigration
President Trump greets Border Patrol Agent Adrian Anzaldua.
President Trump greets Border Patrol Agent Adrian Anzaldua. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

President Trump invited a U.S. Border Patrol agent to the podium during a White House event to pay tribute to federal immigration officials and joked that the agent could speak "perfect English."

Trump asked the agent, Adrian Anzaldua, to discuss his apprehension of a smuggler accused of locking 78 migrants inside a truck near Laredo, Texas, about a week ago.

Trump also appeared to refer to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or CBP, as CBC during Monday's event. CBC stands for Congressional Black Caucus, among other things.

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The hamburgers and hot dogs were all consumed by the time Michael Avenatti arrived and delivered what the Donald Trump-loathing crowd was hungering to hear.