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Ron DeSantis, an upstart Republican riding the endorsement of President Trump, surged to win Florida’s gubernatorial primary Tuesday, setting up a starkly ideological fight with a Bernie Sanders acolyte vying to become the first black governor in state history.

The contest in the country’s preeminent battleground state — already the costliest governor’s race in the country — will pit two 39-year-old candidates, U.S. Rep. DeSantis and Democratic Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who both started the campaign as considerable long shots.

In Tuesday’s other marquee contest, the U.S. Senate race in Arizona, Rep. Martha McSally easily bested former state lawmaker Kelli Ward and ex-Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio to win the GOP nomination for the seat being vacated by Republican Jeff Flake.

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President Trump released the following statement:

Despite our differences on policy and politics, I respect Senator John McCain’s service to our country and, in his honor, have signed a proclamation to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff until the day of his interment.

I have asked Vice President Mike Pence to offer an address at the ceremony honoring Senator McCain at the United States Capitol this Friday.

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Sen. John McCain in 2007.
Sen. John McCain in 2007. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Rick Davis, Sen. John McCain’s former presidential campaign manager and a family spokesman, read the following farewell statement from the Arizona Republican at a news conference in Phoenix on Monday:
 
“My fellow Americans, whom I have gratefully served for 60 years, and especially my fellow Arizonans.
 
“Thank you for the privilege of serving you and for the rewarding life that service in uniform and in public office has allowed me to lead. I have tried to serve our country honorably. I have made mistakes, but I hope my love for America will be weighed favorably against them. 
 
“I have often observed that I am the luckiest person on Earth. I feel that way even now as I prepare for the end of my life. I have loved my life, all of it. I have had experiences, adventures and friendships enough for 10 satisfying lives, and I am so thankful. Like most people, I have regrets. But I would not trade a day of my life, in good or bad times, for the best day of anyone else’s.  
 
“I owe that satisfaction to the love of my family. No man ever had a more loving wife or children he was prouder of than I am of mine. And I owe it to America. To be connected to America’s causes — liberty, equal justice, respect for the dignity of all people — brings happiness more sublime than life’s fleeting pleasures. Our identities and sense of worth are not circumscribed, but enlarged, by serving good causes bigger than ourselves. 
 
“‘Fellow Americans’ — that association has meant more to me than any other. I lived and died a proud American. We are citizens of the world’s greatest republic, a nation of ideals, not blood and soil. We are blessed and are a blessing to humanity when we uphold and advance those ideals at home and in the world. We have helped liberate more people from tyranny and poverty than ever before in history. We have acquired great wealth and power in the process. 
 
“We weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners of the globe. We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals, rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been. 
 
“We are 325 million opinionated, vociferous individuals. We argue and compete and sometimes even vilify each other in our raucous public debates. But we have always had so much more in common with each other than in disagreement. If only we remember that and give each other the benefit of the presumption that we all love our country, we will get through these challenging times. We will come through them stronger than before. We always do. 
 
“Ten years ago, I had the privilege to concede defeat in the election for president. I want to end my farewell to you with the heartfelt faith in Americans that I felt so powerfully that evening. I feel it powerfully still. 
 
“Do not despair of our present difficulties, but believe always in the promise and greatness of America, because nothing is inevitable here. Americans never quit. We never surrender. We never hide from history. We make history. 
 
“Farewell, fellow Americans. God bless you, and God bless America.”

In a remarkable and scathing recrimination, the Vatican’s former ambassador to Washington accused Pope Francis and his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday of knowingly hiding sexual abuse allegations involving a now-disgraced American cardinal, further convulsing a church in crisis.

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An American flag above the White House flies at full-staff on Monday.
An American flag above the White House flies at full-staff on Monday. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

The flags at the White House, which were lowered over the weekend to mark the death of Sen. John McCain, are back at full-staff.

The flags at the U.S. Capitol, meanwhile, remained at half-staff on Monday to honor the Arizona Republican, who died Saturday of brain cancer.

President Trump offered his condolences on Twitter to McCain's family but did not issue a presidential proclamation with an order lowering the flags. The two had a long-running feud.

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When Donald Trump ran for president, he didn’t exactly wow Arizona. He carried the state with less than 50% support, though you’d never know it from Republicans vying in Tuesday’s U.S. Senate primary.

While on the campaign trail in October 2008, John McCain — then the Republican presidential nominee — also countered a woman’s belief that Barack Obama was “an Arab,” according to footage from the Associated Press.

The U.S. flag flies at half-staff in honor of Sen. John McCain at the White House on Sunday.
The U.S. flag flies at half-staff in honor of Sen. John McCain at the White House on Sunday. (Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA/Shutterstock)

A fighter. A maverick. The conscience of the Senate.

Former colleagues of Sen. John McCain paid tribute to the Arizona Republican's life and service to the country on Sunday, hailing him as a principled and independent voice that will be sorely missed at a time of bitter division in Washington, D.C.

The White House lowered flags to half-staff in honor of McCain, who died Saturday at the age of 81 after a battle with brain cancer.

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Vice President Mike Pence and his wife, Karen Pence, are offering condolences to the family of Arizona Sen. John McCain following the senator's death.

Pence said on Twitter that “we honor his lifetime of service to this nation in our military and in public life.” Pence tweeted that McCain's family and friends will be in their prayers, adding, “God bless John McCain.”

Pence tweeted his condolences after President Trump offered his “deepest sympathies and respect” to McCain's family. Trump has had a strained relationship with the Republican senator since the president questioned whether McCain was a war hero.

(Mark Boster/ Los Angeles Times)

The death of Sen. John McCain brought an outpouring of tributes from Washington. Even the senator’s most bitter political rivals weighed in with gratitude for his service, straight talk and decency.

President Trump, who rarely missed an opportunity to try to tear down the Arizona Republican when he was alive – mocking McCain even for his time as a prisoner of war – offered a respectful note of condolence, as did the first lady.  The Trump Twitter messages followed a report in the Washington Post that President Trump had purposefully avoided sending any public well wishes to McCain in his final days, as the bitterness between the two men endured.

Before the Trumps posted their message, President Obama – who ran against McCain in the 2008 election – had posted his tribute.