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President Trump’s proposed grand parade of American military equipment could cost as much as $30 million, his budget director said Wednesday.

In taking the administration’s first stab at a price tag on the project, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told lawmakers he has looked at more than one cost projection.

“I’ve seen various different cost estimates from between, I think, $10 million and $30 million, depending on the size of the parade, the scope of it, the length of it, those types of things,” Mulvaney told members of the House Budget Committee. “We’ve not accounted for it in this year’s budget simply because it’s come up at the last minute.”

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Former White House aide Rob Porter, right, Chief of Staff John Kelly, left, and economic advisor Gary Cohn arrive at Andrews Air Force Base.
Former White House aide Rob Porter, right, Chief of Staff John Kelly, left, and economic advisor Gary Cohn arrive at Andrews Air Force Base. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill want to know how former presidential aide Rob Porter was allowed to work at the White House under an interim security clearance — despite allegations of spousal abuse.

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.), chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, told CNN on Wednesday that the panel decided Tuesday night to launch an investigation.

Word of the probe comes a day after the FBI publicly contradicted the White House over Porter, who has been accused of domestic abuse by his two ex-wives. The FBI said that it gave the Trump administration information on multiple occasions last year about Porter and that the investigation wrapped up in January.

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A longtime personal attorney for President Donald Trump said that he paid $130,000 to an adult-film star who had told people she had an affair with Trump a decade before he won the presidency. (Feb. 14, 2018)

President Trump's personal attorney said Tuesday he paid $130,000 out of his own pocket to a porn actress who allegedly had a sexual relationship with Trump in 2006.

Michael Cohen said in a statement to the New York Times that he was not reimbursed by the Trump Organization or the Trump campaign for the payment to Stormy Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford.

Cohen wrote, "The payment to Ms. Clifford was lawful, and was not a campaign contribution or a campaign expenditure by anyone."

(AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump's administration didn't offer "legally adequate reasons" for ending a program that spared many young immigrants from deportation if they were brought to the U.S. as children, a judge ruled Tuesday as he ordered the program to continue.

U.S. District Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis in Brooklyn, N.Y., said in a written order that the Republican president "indisputably" had the power to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program but relied on flawed legal positions in doing so.

"The Trump administration should be able to alter the policies and priorities set by its predecessor," Garaufis said.

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Financial markets delivered an unwelcome gift for Jerome H. Powell when he was sworn in last week as chairman of the Federal Reserve — a nosedive.

FBI director Christopher Wray's statement contradicts the White House, which said it was still waiting for the investigation to be finished.

The FBI director said Tuesday the bureau completed its security check on President Trump’s staff secretary Rob Porter last summer, an account that casts more doubt on the White House’s version of when officials learned of Porter’s history of domestic violence allegations.

FBI Director Christopher Wray told the Senate Intelligence Committee that the FBI provided a partial report on Porter last March, submitted a completed investigation in late July, and sent requested followup information in November.

“We administratively closed the file in January, and then earlier this month we received some additional information, and we passed that along as well,” Wray said. He declined to give details of what the FBI reported.

President Trump’s top intelligence advisor told senators Feb. 13 that he expects Russia to mount an operation to influence U.S. voters in the November 2018 election.

President Trump’s top intelligence advisor told senators on Tuesday that he expects Russia to mount an operation to influence U.S. voters in the November midterm elections, much as it did during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“We expect Russia to continue using propaganda, social media, false flag personas, sympathetic spokesmen and other means to influence, to try to build on its wide range of operations, and exacerbate social and political fissures in the United States,” Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on global threats. 

He added, “There should be no doubt that Russia perceives its past efforts as successful and views the 2018 U.S. midterm elections as a potential target.”

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As the Senate opened a much-anticipated immigration debate Monday, lawmakers may be embarking on something rarely attempted anymore in Congress: openly and collaboratively legislating.

The FBI headquarters is seen on February 2, 2018 in Washington, DC.
The FBI headquarters is seen on February 2, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

After years of trying to move, the FBI wants to tear down its vast headquarters building and construct a new command post on the same site in downtown Washington.

The bureau has worked for years to replace the 45-year-old concrete behemoth, which was named for FBI founder and longtime director J. Edgar Hoover.

The building is beset by crumbling concrete, outdated infrastructure to accommodate digital technology and numerous security vulnerabilities.