Advertisement
1065 posts
Advertisement
Advertisement
Deputy Atty. Gen. Rod Rosenstein in May.
Deputy Atty. Gen. Rod Rosenstein in May. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Deputy Atty. Gen. Rod Rosenstein is flying Monday with President Trump on Air Force One to a police chiefs' conference in Florida.

The flight provides an opportunity for their most extensive conversation since news reports last month that Rosenstein had discussed possibly secretly recording Trump to expose chaos in the White House and invoking constitutional provisions to get him removed from office.

The reports, which Rosenstein denied, fueled speculation that Rosenstein might be fired or resign. Rosenstein told officials that he would be willing to resign and met at the White House with Chief of Staff John Kelly during a chaotic day two weeks ago that ended with him still in his Justice Department job.

Former KTTC-TV multimedia journalist James Bunner.
Former KTTC-TV multimedia journalist James Bunner. (Mark Vancleave / Star Tribune)

A southern Minnesota television reporter who wore a "Make America Great Again" hat to a Trump rally that he was covering has been fired.

James Bunner was a multimedia journalist for KTTC-TV in Austin. He wore the hat Thursday while covering President Donald Trump's appearance in Rochester and images of him wearing the hat began appearing on Twitter.

News director Noel Sederstrom says the station does not allow staff members to cover stories while wearing apparel from political campaigns. Sederstrom says Bunner was fired Friday.

Advertisement

Democrats don't seem to have the votes to keep Brett Kavanaugh from joining the Supreme Court, but that's not stopping them from taking to the Senate floor in a parade of speeches into the early morning against the conservative jurist.

Hours before the expected roll call vote that would elevate the appeals court judge to the nation's highest court, Democrats are making clear their strong opposition.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York says there's one fundamental question for senators when they decide Kavanaugh's fate: "Do we, as a country, value women?"

  • Supreme Court
First Lady Melania Trump.
First Lady Melania Trump. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

Melania Trump is offering some supportive words for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Here's what she tells reporters traveling with her in Egypt: "I think he's highly qualified for the Supreme Court."

The first lady is wrapping up a four-country tour of Africa.

  • Supreme Court

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said Friday she will support Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, likely securing his confirmation over the weekend.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against moving forward with the nomination and later said she would oppose Kavanaugh in the final vote. She was the first Republican to break with the party and join most Democrats in opposing Kavanaugh.

Another potential swing vote, Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), voted yes on Friday’s motion to end the debate over Kavanaugh. He later said he would vote for confirmation barring some sudden, unexpected development. He was instrumental in delaying the vote to allow for a renewed FBI probe this week.

Advertisement
  • Supreme Court
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) walks to the Senate floor on Friday.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) walks to the Senate floor on Friday. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

The Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh advanced Friday in a narrow 51-49 vote, but there are no guarantees the final vote, expected as early as Saturday, will have the same outcome.

The final result is largely in the hands of a single person, Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against moving forward with the nomination and later said she would oppose Kavanaugh in the final vote. She was the first Republican to break with the party and join most Democrats in opposing Kavanaugh.

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) walks to the Senate floor for a cloture vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) walks to the Senate floor for a cloture vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) told reporters Friday he would vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, “unless something big changes.”

Flake’s decision leaves two senators — Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) — who have not announced how they will vote this weekend. On Friday morning, Flake, Collins and Manchin voted yes on advancing the controversial nomination.

Collins is expected to disclose her final decision in a floor speech at 3 p.m. EDT Friday; Manchin has not indicated when or if he plans to announce his vote in advance.